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Modeling the Drivers of Urban Land Use Change in the Pearl River Delta, China: Integrating Remote Sensing with Socioeconomic Data

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  • Karen C. Seto
  • Robert K. Kaufmann

Abstract

This paper estimates econometric models of the socioeconomic drivers of urban land use change in the Pearl River Delta, China. The panel data used to estimate the models are generated by combining high-resolution remote sensing data with economic and demographic data from annual compendium. The relations between variables are estimated using a random coef ficient model. Results indicate that urban expansion is associated with foreign direct investment and relative rates of productivity generated by land associated with agricultural and urban uses. This suggests that large-scale investments in industrial development, rather than local land users, play the major role in urban land conversion.

Suggested Citation

  • Karen C. Seto & Robert K. Kaufmann, 2003. "Modeling the Drivers of Urban Land Use Change in the Pearl River Delta, China: Integrating Remote Sensing with Socioeconomic Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(1), pages 106-121.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:79:y:2003:i:1:p:106-121
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Irene Eng, 1997. "The Rise of Manufacturing Towns: Externally Driven Industrialization and Urban Development in the Pearl River Delta of China," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 554-568, December.
    2. Chomitz, Kenneth M & Gray, David A, 1996. "Roads, Land Use, and Deforestation: A Spatial Model Applied to Belize," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 487-512, September.
    3. Gerald C. Nelson & Daniel Hellerstein, 1997. "Do Roads Cause Deforestation? Using Satellite Images in Econometric Analysis of Land Use," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 80-88.
    4. Meng, Xin & Zhang, Junsen, 2001. "The Two-Tier Labor Market in Urban China: Occupational Segregation and Wage Differentials between Urban Residents and Rural Migrants in Shanghai," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 485-504, September.
    5. Peter C. B. Phillips & Hyungsik R. Moon, 1999. "Linear Regression Limit Theory for Nonstationary Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(5), pages 1057-1112, September.
    6. K C Clarke & S Hoppen & L Gaydos, 1997. "A self-modifying cellular automaton model of historical urbanization in the San Francisco Bay area," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 24(2), pages 247-261, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Deng, Xiangzheng & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott & Uchida, Emi, 2008. "Growth, population and industrialization, and urban land expansion of China," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 96-115, January.
    2. Chau, Nancy H. & Qin, Yu & Zhang, Weiwen, 2015. "Networked Leaders in the Shadow of the Market – A Chinese Experiment in Allocating Land Conversion Rights," Working Papers 250022, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    3. Ling Zhang & Yehua Dennis Wei & Ran Meng, 2017. "Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Spatial Determinants of Urban Growth in Suzhou, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(3), pages 1-22, March.
    4. Man Li & JunJie Wu & Xiangzheng Deng, 2013. "Identifying Drivers of Land Use Change in China: A Spatial Multinomial Logit Model Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(4), pages 632-654.
    5. Li, Man & De Pinto, Alessandro & Ulimwengu, John M. & You, Liangzhi & Robertson, Richard D., 2012. "Impacts of Paving Roads for Development in the Democratic Republic of Congo: Deforestation and Biological Carbon Loss," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126672, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Jing Qian & Yunfei Peng & Cheng Luo & Chao Wu & Qingyun Du, 2015. "Urban Land Expansion and Sustainable Land Use Policy in Shenzhen: A Case Study of China’s Rapid Urbanization," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-16, December.
    7. Deininger, Klaus & Jin, Songqing, 2009. "Securing property rights in transition: Lessons from implementation of China's rural land contracting law," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 70(1-2), pages 22-38, May.
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2015:i:1:p:16:d:61206 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Taiyang Zhong & Xianjin Huang & Lifang Ye & Steffanie Scott, 2014. "The Impacts on Illegal Farmland Conversion of Adopting Remote Sensing Technology for Land Inspection in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-26, July.
    10. Chau, Nancy & Qin, Yu & Zhang, Weiwen, 2016. "Leader Networks and Transaction Costs: A Chinese Experiment in Interjurisdictional Contracting," IZA Discussion Papers 9641, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Ronghui Tan & Kehao Zhou & Qingsong He & Hengzhou Xu, 2016. "Analyzing the Effects of Spatial Interaction among City Clusters on Urban Growth—Case of Wuhan Urban Agglomeration," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-14, August.
    12. Li, Man & Wu, JunJie & Deng, Xiangzheng, 2009. "Empirical Analysis of Land-use Change and Soil Carbon Sequestration Cost in China," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49568, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:6:p:879-:d:99424 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Man Li & Alessandro Pinto & John M. Ulimwengu & Liangzhi You & Richard D. Robertson, 2015. "Impacts of Road Expansion on Deforestation and Biological Carbon Loss in the Democratic Republic of Congo," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 60(3), pages 433-469, March.
    15. Li Jiang & Yonghui Zhang, 2016. "Modeling Urban Expansion and Agricultural Land Conversion in Henan Province, China: An Integration of Land Use and Socioeconomic Data," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-12, September.
    16. Khalid Sekkat, 2013. "How Does Urban Concentration Affect Poverty in Developing Countries?," Working Papers 809, Economic Research Forum, revised Dec 2013.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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