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The Influence of Market and Agricultural Policy Signals on the Level of Organic Farming


  • Wheeler, Sarah Ann


Over the last two decades, organic farming has been one of the few sectors of agriculture to increase exponentially across the world. This paper aims to analyse the relationship of market and agricultural policy signals on the share of organic farming, with a cross-country analysis in two key years (1990 and 2001). Evidence is provided on the importance of public organic agricultural support, organic farming research and development, the availability of marketing and sales outlets for organic produce and countries environmental regulations in positively driving the adoption of organic agriculture by farmers. There seems to be more support for the influence of agricultural policy signals than market signals.

Suggested Citation

  • Wheeler, Sarah Ann, 2006. "The Influence of Market and Agricultural Policy Signals on the Level of Organic Farming," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25333, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae06:25333

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rigby, D. & Caceres, D., 2001. "Organic farming and the sustainability of agricultural systems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 21-40, April.
    2. Michael Burton & Dan Rigby & Trevor Young, 2003. "Modelling the adoption of organic horticultural technology in the UK using Duration Analysis," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(1), pages 29-54, March.
    3. Hendry, David F, 1980. "Econometrics-Alchemy or Science?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(188), pages 387-406, November.
    4. Lohr, Luanne & Salomonsson, Lennart, 2000. "Conversion subsidies for organic production: results from Sweden and lessons for the United States," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(2), March.
    5. Damania, Richard & Fredriksson, Per G. & List, John A., 2003. "Trade liberalization, corruption, and environmental policy formation: theory and evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 490-512, November.
    6. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119, June.
    7. Rigby, Dan & Young, Trevor & Burton, Michael, 2001. "The development of and prospects for organic farming in the UK," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 599-613, December.
    8. Eliste, Paavo & Fredriksson, Per G., 2002. "Environmental Regulations, Transfers, and Trade: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 234-250, March.
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    More about this item


    organic farming; agricultural policy signals; market signals; Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management; Marketing; Q10; Q16; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy


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