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Water Saving Technology in Chinese Rice Production - Evidence from Survey Data

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Listed:
  • Abdulai, Awudu
  • Glauben, Thomas
  • Herzfeld, Thomas
  • Zhou, Shudong

Abstract

Whereas water is an important input in rice production, China faces severe problems with increasing demand for water and limited water resources. In conventional paddy production, one of the most important irrigated crops, a significant amount of irrigation water is lost due to percolation and evaporation. Therefore, it exist a vivid research in water saving rice technologies. This paper analyzes the adoption of one of these water-saving rice production technologies, the so-called Ground Cover Rice Production System (GCRPS), in the Hubei province. Based on farm survey data several factors which affect the adoption decision could be identified. The adoption decision is treated as a binary choice problem and therefore a probit model is used for the econometric analysis. The main determinants of the adoption decision are the number of previous adoptions, the membership in an extension service and the income of the household. Additionally, soil characteristics show a significant impact on the probability of adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdulai, Awudu & Glauben, Thomas & Herzfeld, Thomas & Zhou, Shudong, 2005. "Water Saving Technology in Chinese Rice Production - Evidence from Survey Data," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24708, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae05:24708
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/24708
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher B. Barrett & Christine M. Moser & Oloro V. McHugh & Joeli Barison, 2004. "Better Technology, Better Plots, or Better Farmers? Identifying Changes in Productivity and Risk among Malagasy Rice Farmers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(4), pages 869-888.
    2. Huffman, Wallace E., 2001. "Human capital: Education and agriculture," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 7, pages 333-381 Elsevier.
    3. Norris, Patricia E. & Batie, Sandra S., 1987. "Virginia Farmers' Soil Conservation Decisions: An Application Of Tobit Analysis," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
    4. Norris, Patricia E. & Batie, Sandra S., 1987. "Virginia Farmers' Soil Conservation Decisions: An Application of Tobit Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(01), pages 79-90, July.
    5. Lohmar, Bryan & Wang, Jinxia & Rozelle, Scott & Huang, Jikun & Dawe, David, 2003. "China'S Agricultural Water Policy Reforms: Increasing Investment, Resolving Conflicts, And Revising Incentives," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33643, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. Moser, Christine M. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2003. "The disappointing adoption dynamics of a yield-increasing, low external-input technology: the case of SRI in Madagascar," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 1085-1100, June.
    7. Abdulai, Awudu & Binder, Claudia R., 2006. "Slash-and-burn cultivation practice and agricultural input demand and output supply," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(02), pages 201-220, April.
    8. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Blanke, Amelia & Rozelle, Scott & Lohmar, Bryan & Wang, Jinxia & Huang, Jikun, 2005. "Rural Water Saving Technology Adoption in Northern China: An Analysis of Survey Data," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19437, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Blanke, Amelia & Rozelle, Scott & Lohmar, Bryan & Wang, Jinxia & Huang, Jikun, 2007. "Water saving technology and saving water in China," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 139-150, January.
    3. Wided Mattoussi & Foued Mattoussi, 2010. "Adoption of Modern Irrigation Technologies in the Presence of Water Theft and Corruption: Evidence from Public Irrigated Areas in Medjez El Bab," Working Papers 570, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Jan 2010.
    4. Wided Mattoussi & Paul Seabright, 2014. "Cooperation against Theft: A Test of Incentives for Water Management in Tunisia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(1), pages 124-153.
    5. Rejesus, Roderick M. & Palis, Florencia G. & Rodriguez, Divina Gracia P. & Lampayan, Ruben M. & Bouman, Bas A.M., 2011. "Impact of the alternate wetting and drying (AWD) water-saving irrigation technique: Evidence from rice producers in the Philippines," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 280-288, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; technology adoption; water; GCRPS; probit; Crop Production/Industries; O30; Q16;

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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