IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/eaa115/116402.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Socio-Economic Status And The Structural Change Of Dietary Intake In Hungary: A Pannel Study

Author

Listed:
  • Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan
  • Ferto, Imre
  • Marreiros, Cristina

Abstract

Typically, big changes in the economic system lead to alterations on the disposable income of families and thus on their spending for different type of products, including food. These may imply, in the long run, a structural modification of the quality of diet of the population. After the fall of the socialist system, in the past two decades Central and Eastern European countries, including Hungary, went through a profound, and sometimes difficult transition of their political and economic systems, shifting from a centralized planned economy to an open market economy, and more importantly, the European Union integration. Economic change in lower-income and transitional economies of the world appears to coincide with increasing rapid social change. With respect to nutrition there is evidence that those countries are changing their diets and that these changes seem to be happening at a faster pace than ever before. In this paper we analyze the evolution of Hungarian dietary patterns based on socio-economic status (SES) data between 1993 and 2007. Data allows to define and profile several clusters based on aggregated consumption data, than to inspect the influence of SES variables using OLS and multinominal logit estimations.

Suggested Citation

  • Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan & Ferto, Imre & Marreiros, Cristina, 2010. "Socio-Economic Status And The Structural Change Of Dietary Intake In Hungary: A Pannel Study," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116402, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa115:116402
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.116402
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/116402/files/3A-2_Bakucs_Ferto_Marreiros.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.22004/ag.econ.116402?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Regmi, Anita & Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Unnevehr, Laurian J., 2008. "Convergence in Global Food Demand and Delivery," Economic Research Report 56449, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Seale, James L., Jr. & Regmi, Anita & Bernstein, Jason, 2003. "International Evidence On Food Consumption Patterns," Technical Bulletins 33580, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Seale, James L., Jr. & Regmi, Anita & Bernstein, Jason, 2003. "International Evidence On Food Consumption Patterns," Technical Bulletins 33580, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Abdoul G. Sam & Babatunde O. Abidoye & Sihle Mashaba, 2021. "Climate change and household welfare in sub-Saharan Africa: empirical evidence from Swaziland," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 13(2), pages 439-455, April.
    2. von Braun, Joachim, 2007. "The world food situation: New driving forces and required actions," Food policy reports 18, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Christophe Gouel, 2014. "Food Price Volatility and Domestic Stabilization Policies in Developing Countries," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Food Price Volatility, pages 261-306, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Beaman, Lori & Dillon, Andrew, 2012. "Do household definitions matter in survey design? Results from a randomized survey experiment in Mali," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 124-135.
    5. Mr. Douglas Hostland & Patrick Blagrave & Peter Elliott & Fan Zhang & Mr. Roberto Garcia-Saltos & Mr. Douglas Laxton, 2013. "Adding China to the Global Projection Model," IMF Working Papers 2013/256, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Jonathan M. Nzuma & Rakhal Sarker, 2010. "An error corrected almost ideal demand system for major cereals in Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 43-50, January.
    7. Amanda M. Countryman & Amy D. Hagerman, 2017. "Retrospective Economic Analysis of Foot and Mouth Disease Eradication in the Latin American Beef Sector," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(2), pages 257-273, April.
    8. Sharon S Nakhimovsky & Andrea B Feigl & Carlos Avila & Gael O’Sullivan & Elizabeth Macgregor-Skinner & Mark Spranca, 2016. "Taxes on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages to Reduce Overweight and Obesity in Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(9), pages 1-22, September.
    9. Li, Kuo & Griffith, Garry & Kingwell, Ross & Malcolm, Bill, 2017. "Measuring the Returns to Investment in Research and Development in the Australian Grains Industry," 2017 Conference (61st), February 7-10, 2017, Brisbane, Australia 258674, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    10. Jay R. Corrigan & Matthew C. Rousu, 2006. "The Effect of Initial Endowments in Experimental Auctions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(2), pages 448-457.
    11. Sébastien Dessus & Santiago Herrera & Rafael De Hoyos, 2008. "The impact of food inflation on urban poverty and its monetary cost: some back‐of‐the‐envelope calculations," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 417-429, November.
    12. Pierre Dubois & Rachel Griffith & Aviv Nevo, 2014. "Do Prices and Attributes Explain International Differences in Food Purchases?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 832-867, March.
    13. Anríquez, Gustavo & Daidone, Silvio & Mane, Erdgin, 2013. "Rising food prices and undernourishment: A cross-country inquiry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 190-202.
    14. Ogoudélé S. Codjo & Alvaro Durand‐Morat & Grant H. West & Lawton Lanier Nalley & Rodolfo M. Nayga & Eric J. Wailes, 2021. "Estimating demand elasticities for rice in Benin," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 52(2), pages 343-361, March.
    15. Femenia, Fabienne & Gohin, Alexandre, 2007. "Estimating price elasticities of food trade functions: How relevant is the gravity approach?," Working Papers 7211, TRADEAG - Agricultural Trade Agreements.
    16. Valin, Hugo & Havlik, Petr & Mosnier, Aline & Obersteiner, Michael, 2010. "Climate Change Mitigation And Future Food Consumption Patterns," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116392, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    17. Arega D. Alene & V. M. Manyong & Eric F. Tollens & Steffen Abele, 2009. "Efficiency–equity tradeoffs and the scope for resource reallocation in agricultural research: evidence from Nigeria," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 1-14, January.
    18. Stephen MacDonald & Suwen Pan & Agapi Somwaru & Francis Tuan, 2010. "China's role in world cotton and textile markets: a joint computable general equilibrium/partial equilibrium approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(7), pages 875-885.
    19. Yusuf Soner Baskaya & Tugrul Gurgur & Fethi Ogunc, 2008. "Islenmis Gida Fiyatlarini Belirleyen Faktorler," Working Papers 0809, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    20. Shiyuan Chen & Sally Wallace, 2009. "Food Consumption in Jamaica: A Household and Social Behavior," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0901, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaa115:116402. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/eaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: AgEcon Search (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/eaaeeea.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.