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Does Proximity Determine Organic Certification Among Farmers Using Organic Practices?

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  • Torres, Ariana P.
  • Marshall, Maria I.
  • Alexander, Corinne E.

Abstract

Organically produced products are one of the fastest growing segments of food sales in the U.S. The extent to which proximity to consumer markets influences certification among producers that farm using organic practices was estimated in this study. Data from a 2012 survey of 16 states with 36.15% response rate was used. A logit model was analyzed. Distance to markets was found to be positively associated with the decision to certify. Our results provide important information about what motivates farmers who are using organic production practices to become certified.

Suggested Citation

  • Torres, Ariana P. & Marshall, Maria I. & Alexander, Corinne E., 2013. "Does Proximity Determine Organic Certification Among Farmers Using Organic Practices?," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150607, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150607
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/150607
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Burton & Dan Rigby & Trevor Young, 1999. "Analysis of the Determinants of Adoption of Organic Horticultural Techniques in the UK," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 47-63.
    2. Carolyn Dimitri, 2012. "Use of Local Markets by Organic Producers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(2), pages 301-306.
    3. Greene, Catherine R. & Dimitri, Carolyn & Lin, Biing-Hwan & McBride, William D. & Oberholtzer, Lydia & Smith, Travis A., 2009. "Emerging Issues in the U.S. Organic Industry," Economic Information Bulletin 58617, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Kim Darby & Marvin T. Batte & Stan Ernst & Brian Roe, 2008. "Decomposing Local: A Conjoint Analysis of Locally Produced Foods," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(2), pages 476-486.
    5. D'souza, Gerard & Cyphers, Douglas & Phipps, Tim, 1993. "Factors Affecting the Adoption of Sustainable Agricultural Practices," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(02), pages 159-165, October.
    6. Genius, Margarita & Pantzios, Christos J. & Tzouvelekas, Vangelis, 2006. "Information Acquisition and Adoption of Organic Farming Practices," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(01), April.
    7. Dimitri, Carolyn & Greene, Catherine R., 2002. "Recent Growth Patterns In The U.S. Organic Foods Market," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33715, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Park Timothy & Lohr Luanne, 2006. "Choices of Marketing Outlets by Organic Producers: Accounting for Selectivity Effects," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-26, July.
    9. Park, Timothy A., 2009. "Assessing the Returns from Organic Marketing Channels," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(3), December.
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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management;

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