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Assessing the Returns from Organic Marketing Channels


  • Park, Timothy A.


Organic farmers face heightened pressure in developing a portfolio of different marketing channels and in bargaining competitively with increasingly sophisticated marketing participants in the supply chain for organic products. This research assists producers by identifying specific farm and demographic factors that enhance earnings given the choice of marketing outlet. The two significant selectivity coefficients confirm that organic earnings when marketing through a single outlet are biased upward since farmers who are better suited to market through multiple outlets have already moved away from this marketing strategy. An accurate evaluation of the projected earnings from any marketing strategy must account for selectivity effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Park, Timothy A., 2009. "Assessing the Returns from Organic Marketing Channels," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(3), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:57626

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul Baer & Clive L Spash, 2008. "Cost-Benefit Analysis of Climate Change: Stern Revisited," Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED) Working Paper Series 2008-07, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems.
    2. Joseph Cooper & John Loomis, 1993. "Testing whether waterfowl hunting benefits increase with greater water deliveries to wetlands," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(6), pages 545-561, December.
    3. Ribaudo, Marc & Hansen, LeRoy T. & Hellerstein, Daniel & Greene, Catherine R., 2008. "The Use of Markets To Increase Private Investment in Environmental Stewardship," Economic Research Report 56473, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moturi, Walter & Obare, Gideon & Kahi, Alexander, 2015. "Milk Marketing Channel Choices for Enhanced Competitiveness in The Kenya Dairy Supply Chain: A multinomial Logit Approach," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212477, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Nyaupane, Narayan & Gillespie, Jeffrey & McMillin, Kenneth, 2016. "The Marketing of Meat Goats in the US: What, Where, and When?," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 47(3), November.
    3. Sene, Seydina & Paudel, Krishna P. & Park, Timothy A., 2016. "The Changing Structure of Retail Food Stores, Direct Marketing (DM) and Its Impact on Farmers’ Financial Performance," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235736, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Torres, Ariana P. & Marshall, Maria I. & Alexander, Corinne E., 2013. "Does Proximity Determine Organic Certification Among Farmers Using Organic Practices?," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150607, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Veldstra, Michael D. & Alexander, Corinne E. & Marshall, Maria I., 2014. "To certify or not to certify? Separating the organic production and certification decisions," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P2), pages 429-436.


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