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Disease and Behavioral Dynamics for Brucellosis in Elk and Cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area

  • Xie, Fang
  • Horan, Richard D.

We investigate private responses to policies that have been proposed to confront a human-wildlife conflict that likely emerged as a result of a management regime designed to address an earlier human-wildlife conflict: specifically, brucellosis in elk that has spread to cattle in Wyoming. We examine population and disease dynamics under several different management options for the Jackson elk herd, where each option involves a combination of changes in elk feeding and population levels. Farmer responses to these dynamics, when vaccination is not required, are modeled along with the associated impacts to livestock dynamics. We also examine livestock management when there is little-to-no consideration given to the risk posed by elk. In practice, the policies and proposals to address elk have been considered separately of the behavioral responses of farmers, with many livestock advocacy groups are pushing for an elimination of the feeding grounds. Overall, our results contradict the conventional wisdom that farmers would benefit from more stringent disease controls in the elk sector. We find that farmers do experience lower herd-level infection rates when more stringent elk controls are implemented. But this is primarily due to increased vaccination by farmers in response to increased risks to cattle that result from elk spending more time on public grazing areas and farmlands as feedgrounds are closed.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/6404
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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida with number 6404.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea08:6404
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  1. Drew Fudenberg & David K. Levine, 1998. "The Theory of Learning in Games," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061945, June.
  2. Horan, R.D. & Bulte, E.H., 2004. "Optimal and open access harvesting and multi-use species in a second best world," Other publications TiSEM 95000e50-7225-4f4d-aeaf-a, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  3. Richard Horan & Christopher Wolf & Eli Fenichel & Kenneth Mathews, 2008. "Joint Management of Wildlife and Livestock Disease," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 47-70, September.
  4. Rondeau, Daniel, 2001. "Along the Way Back from the Brink," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 156-182, September.
  5. David A. Hennessy, 2007. "Behavioral Incentives, Equilibrium Endemic Disease, and Health Management Policy for Farmed Animals," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(3), pages 698-711.
  6. Richard Horan & Erwin Bulte, 2004. "Optimal and Open Access Harvesting of Multi-Use Species in a Second-Best World," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(3), pages 251-272, July.
  7. Bicknell, Kathryn & Wilen, James E. & Howitt, Richard E., 1999. "Public policy and private incentives for livestock disease control," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 43(4), December.
  8. Jorgen W. Weibull, 1997. "Evolutionary Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262731215, June.
  9. Richard D. Horan & Christopher A. Wolf, 2005. "The Economics of Managing Infectious Wildlife Disease," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 537-551.
  10. Daniel Rondeau & Jon M. Conrad, 2003. "Managing Urban Deer," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 266-281.
  11. Eli P. Fenichel & Richard D. Horan, 2007. "Gender-Based Harvesting in Wildlife Disease Management," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(4), pages 904-920.
  12. Daniel Rondeau & Erwin Bulte, 2007. "Wildlife Damage and Agriculture: A Dynamic Analysis of Compensation Schemes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(2), pages 490-507.
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