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Does Extension Work? Impacts Of A Program To Assist Limited-Resource Farmers In Virginia

Author

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  • Akobundu, Eberechukwu
  • Alwang, Jeffrey Roger
  • Essel, Albert E.
  • Norton, George W.
  • Tegene, Abebayehu

Abstract

Qualitative evidence suggests that 1890 institutions play a significant role in delivering extension information to limited-resource, particularly minority, farmers. However, there is little empirical evidence of economic impacts of public investments in 1890 extension programs. This paper quantifies the economic impacts of the 2501 extension program for limited resource farmers in Virginia.

Suggested Citation

  • Akobundu, Eberechukwu & Alwang, Jeffrey Roger & Essel, Albert E. & Norton, George W. & Tegene, Abebayehu, 2003. "Does Extension Work? Impacts Of A Program To Assist Limited-Resource Farmers In Virginia," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22091, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22091
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oral Capps & Randall A. Kramer, 1985. "Analysis of Food Stamp Participation Using Qualitative Choice Models," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 67(1), pages 49-59.
    2. J. William Levedahl, 1995. "How Much Can Informational Outreach Programs Increase Food Stamp Program Participation?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(2), pages 343-352.
    3. Robinson, Chris, 1989. "The Joint Determination of Union Status and Union Wage Effects: Some Tests of Alternative Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(3), pages 639-667, June.
    4. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
    5. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-318, May.
    6. James Heckman, 1997. "Instrumental Variables: A Study of Implicit Behavioral Assumptions Used in Making Program Evaluations," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(3), pages 441-462.
    7. McLean-Meyinsse, Patricia E. & Hui, Jianguo & Joseph, Randolph, Jr., 1994. "An Empirical Analysis Of Louisiana Small Farmers' Involvement In The Conservation Reserve Program," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Faure, Guy & Davis, Kristin E. & Ragasa, Catherine & Franzel, Steven & Babu, Suresh Chandra, 2016. "Framework to assess performance and impact of pluralistic agricultural extension systems: The best-fit framework revisited:," IFPRI discussion papers 1567, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. José Miguel Benavente & Gustavo Crespi & Alessandro Maffioli, 2007. "The Impact of National Research Funds: An Evaluation of the Chilean FONDECYT," OVE Working Papers 0307, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    3. Francisca Henriquez, 2009. "Microcrédito y su Impacto: Un Acercamiento con Datos Chilenos," OVE Working Papers 0309, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    4. Pedro Cerdán-Infantes & Alessandro Maffioli & Diego Ubfal, 2008. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension Services: The Case of Grape Production in Argentina," OVE Working Papers 0508, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    5. Doris Läpple & Thia Hennessy & Carol Newman, 2013. "Quantifying the Economic Return to Participatory Extension Programmes in Ireland: an Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 467-482, June.
    6. Alessandro Maffioli & Diego Ubfal & Gonzalo Vazquez-Bare & Pedro Cerdan-Infantes, 2013. "Improving technology adoption in agriculture through extension services: evidence from Uruguay," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 64-81, March.
    7. Verónica M. Gonzalez Diez & Pablo Ibarrarán & Alessandro Maffioli & Sandra Rozo, 2009. "The Impact of Technology Adoption on Agricultural Productivity: The Case of the Dominican Republic," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3017, Inter-American Development Bank.

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