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Microfinance and Investment: a Comparison with Bank and Informal Lending

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  • Lucia Dalla Pellegrina

Abstract

Using data from a World Bank survey carried out in Bangladesh during the period 1991-1992, we compare the impact of microfinance programs and other types of credit on agricultural investment. After controlling for several measurable determinants of credit agreements, such as interest rates and collateral, estimates still show that microfinance programs are more likely to increase variable input expenditure than informal and bank credit are able to do. This provides evidence that microfinance incentive devices (joint responsibility, peer monitoring, social sanctions, future credit denial in case of default, etc.), perhaps together with other services associated with programs, are effective in order to promote a productive use of funds.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucia Dalla Pellegrina, 2007. "Microfinance and Investment: a Comparison with Bank and Informal Lending," Working Papers 20070401, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Statistica, revised Apr 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:mis:wpaper:20070401
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Microfnance; Banks; Informal lending; Investment.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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