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International Fisheries Access Agreements and Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Tatyana Chesnokova

    (Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Waseda University,Tokyo, Japan.)

  • Stephanie F. McWhinnie

    (School of Economics, University of Adelaide)

Abstract

International fishery access agreements allow fishermen from one country to harvest fish in another country's waters. We empirically examine, using a unique global panel dataset, why countries sign fisheries access agreements with each other and compare these to the characteristics of countries that choose the path of international trade. We show that access agreements and fish exports are driven by two key motives: a pattern of comparative advantage in fishing, which depends on fish stocks and fishing capacities; and gravity factors of economic size and distance. Our results suggest that most gravity factors work similarly for agreements and exports: larger countries that are closer to each other are more likely to sign access agreements or to trade. However, the pattern of advantage is determined differently: source countries with larger fishing capacity are more likely to export fish, while source countries with lower fishing capacity are more likely to sign agreements.

Suggested Citation

  • Tatyana Chesnokova & Stephanie F. McWhinnie, 2017. "International Fisheries Access Agreements and Trade," School of Economics Working Papers 2017-11, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2017-11
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    File URL: https://media.adelaide.edu.au/economics/papers/doc/wp2017-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cecilia Bellora & Jean-Christophe Bureau & Basak Bayramoglu & Estelle Gozlan & Sébastien Jean, 2020. "Trade and Biodiversity [Commerce et biodiversité]," Working Papers hal-02887592, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International fisheries; access agreements; international trade; empirical;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery
    • Q27 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Issues in International Trade
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment

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