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Isabel Trevino

Personal Details

First Name:Isabel
Middle Name:
Last Name:Trevino
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ptr353
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-San Diego (UCSD)

La Jolla, California (United States)
http://economics.ucsd.edu/

: (858) 534-3383
(858) 534-7040
9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0508
RePEc:edi:deucsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Schotter, Andrew & Trevino, Isabel, 2014. "Is response time predictive of choice? An experimental study of threshold strategies," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2014-305, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).

Articles

  1. Szkup, Michal & Trevino, Isabel, 2015. "Information acquisition in global games of regime change," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 387-428.
  2. Andrew Schotter & Isabel Trevino, 2014. "Belief Elicitation in the Laboratory," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 103-128, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Schotter, Andrew & Trevino, Isabel, 2014. "Is response time predictive of choice? An experimental study of threshold strategies," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2014-305, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).

    Cited by:

    1. Ariel Rubenstein, 2013. "Response time and decision making: An experimental study," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 8(5), pages 540-551, September.
    2. Krajbich Ian & Smith Stephanie M., 2015. "Modeling Eye Movements and Response Times in Consumer Choice," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 55-72, January.
    3. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2016. "The Dual-Process Drift Diffusion Model: Evidence From Response Times," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1274-1282, April.
    4. Goeschl, Timo & Lohse, Johannes, 2016. "Cooperation in Public Good Games. Calculated or Confused?," Working Papers 0626, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    5. Arkady Konovalov & Ian Krajbich, 2016. "Revealed Indifference: Using Response Times to Infer Preferences," Working Papers 16-01, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Echenique, Federico & Saito, Kota, 2017. "Response time and utility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 49-59.

Articles

  1. Szkup, Michal & Trevino, Isabel, 2015. "Information acquisition in global games of regime change," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 387-428.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Morris & Ming Yang, 2016. "Coordination and Continuous Choice," Working Papers 087_2017, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..
    2. George-Marios Angeletos & Chen Lian, 2016. "Incomplete Information in Macroeconomics: Accommodating Frictions in Coordination," NBER Working Papers 22297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Szkup, Michal, 2017. "Multiplier effect and comparative statics in global games of regime change," MPRA Paper 82729, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Stephen Morris & Ming Yang, 2016. "Coordination and the Relative Cost of Distinguishing Nearby States," Working Papers 079_2016, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..

  2. Andrew Schotter & Isabel Trevino, 2014. "Belief Elicitation in the Laboratory," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 103-128, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Brocas, Isabelle & Carrillo, Juan D. & Tarrasó, Jorge, 2018. "Self-awareness of biases in time perception," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 1-19.
    2. Charles F. Manski, 2018. "Survey Measurement of Probabilistic Macroeconomic Expectations: Progress and Promise," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(1), pages 411-471.
    3. María Victoria Anauati & Brian Feld & Sebastian Galiani & Gustavo Torrens, 2015. "Collective Action: Experimental Evidence," NBER Working Papers 20936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Evdokimov, Piotr & Rustichini, Aldo, 2016. "Forward induction: Thinking and behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 195-208.
    5. Bellemare, Charles & Sebald, Alexander & Suetens, Sigrid, 2017. "A note on testing guilt aversion," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 233-239.
    6. Nadine Chlaß & Lata Gangadharan & Kristy Jones, 2015. "Charitable Giving and Intermediation," Monash Economics Working Papers 18-15, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    7. Roberta De Filippis & Antonio Guarino & Philippe Jehiel & Toru Kitagawa, 2016. "Updating ambiguous beliefs in a social learning experiment," CeMMAP working papers CWP18/16, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    8. David Freeman, 2016. "Revealing Naïveté and Sophistication from Procrastination and Preproperation," Discussion Papers dp16-11, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    9. Goeschl, Timo & Jarke, Johannes, 2017. "Trust, but verify? Monitoring, inspection costs, and opportunism under limited observability," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 320-330.
    10. Marco Angrisani & Antonio Guarino & Philippe Jehiel & Toru Kitagawa, 2017. "Information redundancy neglect versus overconfidence: a social learning experiment," CeMMAP working papers CWP32/17, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Dominik Bauer & Irenaeus Wolff, 2018. "Biases in Beliefs: Experimental Evidence," TWI Research Paper Series 109, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
    12. Tiziana Assenza & Te Bao & Cars Hommes & Domenico Massaro, 2014. "Experiments on Expectations in Macroeconomics and Finance," Research in Experimental Economics,in: Experiments in Macroeconomics, volume 17, pages 11-70 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    13. Le Coq, Chloé & Tremewan, James & Wagner, Alexander K., 2015. "On the effects of group identity in strategic environments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 239-252.
    14. Karl Schlag & James Tremewan & Joël Weele, 2015. "A penny for your thoughts: a survey of methods for eliciting beliefs," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 18(3), pages 457-490, September.
    15. Guillaume Hollard & Sébastien Massoni & Jean-Christophe Vergnaud, 2016. "In search of good probability assessors: an experimental comparison of elicitation rules for confidence judgments," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 80(3), pages 363-387, March.
    16. Marion Dupoux, 2017. "Beyond perfect substitutability in public good games: heterogeneous structures of preferences," Working Papers 2017.21, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    17. Madjid Eshaghi Gordji & Gholamreza Askari, 2018. "Hyper-rational choice theory," Papers 1801.10520, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2018.
    18. Sonsino, Doron & Shifrin, Max & Lahav, Eyal, 2016. "Disentangling trust from risk-taking: Triadic approach," MPRA Paper 80095, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Alexander Coutts, 2017. "Good news and bad news are still news: Experimental evidence on belief updating," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp1703, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia, NOVAFRICA.
    20. Grandjean, Gilles & Mantovani, Marco & Mauleon, Ana & Vannetelbosch, Vincent, 2017. "Communication structure and coalition-proofness – Experimental evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 90-102.
    21. Nichole Szembrot, 2018. "Experimental study of cursed equilibrium in a signaling game," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 257-291, June.
    22. Barron, Kai, 2016. "Belief updating: Does the 'good-news, bad-news' asymmetry extend to purely financial domains?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2016-309, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    23. Pamela Giustinelli & Charles F. Manski & Francesca Molinari, 2018. "Tail and Center Rounding of Probabilistic Expectations in the Health and Retirement Study," NBER Working Papers 24559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2014-08-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2014-08-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (1) 2014-08-09. Author is listed
  4. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2014-08-09. Author is listed

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