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Matthew B. Ross

Personal Details

First Name:Matthew
Middle Name:B.
Last Name:Ross
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pro938
http://www.mbross-econ.com/

Affiliation

(90%) Department of Economics
School of Politics and Economics
Claremont Graduate University

Claremont, California (United States)
http://www.cgu.edu/pages/466.asp
RePEc:edi:decguus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Wagner Graduate School of Public Service
New York University (NYU)

New York City, New York (United States)
http://www.nyu.edu/wagner/
RePEc:edi:gsnyuus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Department of Economics
Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio (United States)
http://economics.osu.edu/
RePEc:edi:deohsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jesse Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2021. "Endogenous Driving Behavior in Tests of Racial Profiling," NBER Working Papers 28789, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jesse Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2019. "Addressing Seasonality in Veil of Darkness Tests for Discrimination: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Working papers 2019-07, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  3. Funk, Russell J. & Glennon, Britta & Lane, Julia & Murciano-Goroff, Raviv & Ross, Matthew B., 2019. "Money for Something: Braided Funding and the Structure and Output of Research Groups," IZA Discussion Papers 12762, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. Jesse Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2018. "Now You See Me, Now You Don’t: The Geography of Police Stops," Working papers 2018-22, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  5. Jesse Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2017. "Endogenous Driving Behavior in Tests of Racial Profiling in Police Traffic Stops," Working papers 2017-03, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2020.

Articles

  1. Matthew Ross, 2021. "The Effect of Intensive Margin Changes to Task Content on Employment Dynamics over the Business Cycle," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 74(4), pages 1036-1064, August.
  2. Jesse J. Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2019. "Now You See Me, Now You Don't: The Geography of Police Stops," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 109, pages 143-147, May.
  3. Kenneth A. Couch & Matthew B. Ross & Jessica Vavrek, 2018. "Career Pathways and Integrated Instruction: A National Program Review of I-BEST Implementations," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 99-125, March.
  4. Ross, Matthew B., 2017. "Routine-biased technical change: Panel evidence of task orientation and wage effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 198-214.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jesse Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2017. "Endogenous Driving Behavior in Tests of Racial Profiling in Police Traffic Stops," Working papers 2017-03, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2020.

    Cited by:

    1. Jesse Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2019. "Addressing Seasonality in Veil of Darkness Tests for Discrimination: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Working papers 2019-07, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    2. Jesse J. Kalinowski & Matthew B. Ross & Stephen L. Ross, 2019. "Now You See Me, Now You Don't: The Geography of Police Stops," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 109, pages 143-147, May.

Articles

  1. Ross, Matthew B., 2017. "Routine-biased technical change: Panel evidence of task orientation and wage effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 198-214.

    Cited by:

    1. Enghin Atalay & Phai Phongthiengtham & Sebastian Sotelo & Daniel Tannenbaum, 2020. "The Evolution of Work in the United States," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 1-34, April.
    2. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2018. "The "End of Men" and Rise of Women in the High-Skilled Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 24274, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Davide Consoli & Giovanni Marin & Francesco Rentocchini & Francesco Vona, 2019. "Routinizaton, within-occupation task changes and long-run employment dynamics," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2019-08, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Colin Caines & Florian Hoffmann & Gueorgui Kambourov, 2017. "Complex-Task Biased Technological Change and the Labor Market," Working Papers tecipa-576, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    5. de Vries, Gaaitzen J. & Gentile, Elisabetta & Miroudot, Sébastien & Wacker, Konstantin M., 2020. "The rise of robots and the fall of routine jobs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C).
    6. Marchand, Joseph, 2020. "Routine Tasks were Demanded from Workers during an Energy Boom," Working Papers 2020-8, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    7. Martina Bisello & Marta Fana & Enrique Fernández-Macías & Sergio, 2021. "A comprehensive European database of tasks indices for socio-economic research," JRC Working Papers on Labour, Education and Technology 2021-04, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    8. Cassandro, Nicola & Centra, Marco & Esposito, Piero & Guarascio, Dario, 2020. "What drives employment-unemployment transitions? Evidence from Italian task-based data," GLO Discussion Paper Series 563, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (5) 2017-03-05 2019-01-07 2019-01-14 2019-04-29 2021-05-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (4) 2017-03-05 2019-01-07 2019-04-29 2021-05-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2019-04-29
  4. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (1) 2019-04-29
  5. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2019-12-02
  6. NEP-TRE: Transport Economics (1) 2019-01-14

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