IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pmu494.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Jason Murasko

Personal Details

First Name:Jason
Middle Name:
Last Name:Murasko
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmu494

Affiliation

School of Business
University of Houston-Clear Lake

Clear Lake, Texas (United States)
http://prtl.uhcl.edu/portal/page/portal/BUS/NewBUS/index.html

:

2700 Bay Area Blvd., Houston, TX 77058
RePEc:edi:aueuhus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Jason Murasko, 2015. "The Age Profile of the Income–Health Gradient: An Evaluation of Two Large Cohorts of Contemporary US Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 289-298, June.
  2. Murasko, Jason E., 2013. "Physical growth and cognitive skills in early-life: Evidence from a nationally representative US birth cohort," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 267-277.
  3. Murasko, Jason E., 2013. "Associations between household income, height, and BMI in contemporary US schoolchildren," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 185-196.
  4. Murasko, Jason E., 2009. "Socioeconomic status, height, and obesity in children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 376-386, December.
  5. Murasko, Jason E., 2008. "Male-female differences in the association between socioeconomic status and atherosclerotic risk in adolescents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 1889-1897, December.
  6. Murasko, Jason E., 2008. "An evaluation of the age-profile in the relationship between household income and the health of children in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1489-1502, December.
  7. Jason Murasko, 2008. "Married Women’s Labor Supply and Spousal Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: Results from Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 391-406, September.
  8. Murasko, Jason E., 2006. "Gender differences in the management of risk factors for cardiovascular disease: The importance of insurance status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 1745-1756, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Murasko, Jason E., 2013. "Associations between household income, height, and BMI in contemporary US schoolchildren," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 185-196.

    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Hong & Zhao, Zhong, 2011. "Parental Job Loss and Children’s Health: Ten Years after the Massive Layoff of the SOEs’ Workers in China," IZA Discussion Papers 5846, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Jo, Young, 2014. "What money can buy: Family income and childhood obesity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 1-12.
    3. Millimet, Daniel L. & Tchernis, Rusty, 2015. "Persistence in body mass index in a recent cohort of US children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 157-176.
    4. Bénédicte H. Apouey & Pierre-Yves Geoffard, 2016. "Parents’ education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-01307640, HAL.
    5. Antelo, Manel & Magdalena, Pilar & Reboredo, Juan C., 2017. "Obesity: A major problem for Spanish minors," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 61-73.
    6. Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2016. "Child physical development in the UK: the imprint of time and socioeconomic status," Post-Print halshs-01496908, HAL.
    7. Liu, Hong & Fang, Hai & Zhao, Zhong, 2012. "Urban-Rural Disparities of Child Health and Nutritional Status in China from 1989 to 2006," IZA Discussion Papers 6528, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Murasko, Jason E., 2009. "Socioeconomic status, height, and obesity in children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 376-386, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Leonie Sundmacher, 2012. "The effect of health shocks on smoking and obesity," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(4), pages 451-460, August.
    2. Jo, Young, 2014. "What money can buy: Family income and childhood obesity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 1-12.
    3. Bénédicte H. Apouey & Pierre-Yves Geoffard, 2016. "Parents’ education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-01307640, HAL.
    4. Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2016. "Child physical development in the UK: the imprint of time and socioeconomic status," Post-Print halshs-01496908, HAL.
    5. Jahns, Lisa & Adair, Linda & Mroz, Thomas & Popkin, Barry M., 2012. "The declining prevalence of overweight among Russian children: Income, diet, and physical activity behavior changes," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-146.
    6. Classen, Timothy J., 2010. "Measures of the intergenerational transmission of body mass index between mothers and their children in the United States, 1981-2004," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 30-43, March.
    7. Akpalu, Wisdom & Zhang, Xu, 2014. "Fast-food consumption and child body mass index in China: Application of an endogenous switching regression model," WIDER Working Paper Series 139, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Hruschka, Daniel J. & Brewis, Alexandra A., 2013. "Absolute wealth and world region strongly predict overweight among women (ages 18–49) in 360 populations across 36 developing countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 337-344.
    9. Bénédicte H. Apouey & Pierre-Yves Geoffard, 2015. "Parents' education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years," Working Papers halshs-01223321, HAL.

  3. Murasko, Jason E., 2008. "Male-female differences in the association between socioeconomic status and atherosclerotic risk in adolescents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 1889-1897, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Davillas, Apostolos & Jones, Andrew M. & Benzeval, Michaela, 2017. "The income-health gradient: evidence from self-reported health and biomarkers using longitudinal data on income," ISER Working Paper Series 2017-03, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

  4. Murasko, Jason E., 2008. "An evaluation of the age-profile in the relationship between household income and the health of children in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1489-1502, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Goode, Alison & Mavromaras, Kostas & zhu, Rong, 2014. "Family income and child health in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 152-165.
    2. Johnston, DW & Propper, C & Pudney, SE & Shields, MA, "undated". "Is there an income gradient in child health? It depends whom you ask," Working Papers 5283, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.
    3. Juergen Jung & Chung Tran, 2010. "Medical Consumption Over the Life Cycle: Facts from a U.S. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey," Discussion Papers 2010-08, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    4. Khanam, Rasheda & Nghiem, Hong Son & Connelly, Luke B., 2008. "Child Health and the Income Gradient: Evidence from Australia," MPRA Paper 13959, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jason Fletcher & Barbara Wolfe, 2014. "Increasing Our Understanding Of The Health‐Income Gradient In Children," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 473-486, April.
    6. Pinka Chatterji & Kajal Lahiri & Jingya Song, 2011. "The Dynamics of Income-related Health Inequality among US Children," CESifo Working Paper Series 3572, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. van Kippersluis, Hans & O'Donnell, Owen & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Van Ourti, Tom, 2010. "Socioeconomic differences in health over the life cycle in an Egalitarian country," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 428-438, February.
    8. Titus Galama & Hans van Kippersluis, 2010. "A Theory of Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Over the Life Cycle," Working Papers WR-773, RAND Corporation.
    9. Anne Nolan & Richard Layte, 2014. "Socio-economic Inequalities in Child Health in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(1), pages 25-64.
    10. Kuehnle, Daniel, 2014. "The causal effect of family income on child health in the UK," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 137-150.
    11. Edoka, I.P., 2012. "Decomposing Differences in Cotinine Distribution between Children and Adolescents from Different Socioeconomic Backgrounds," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/29, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    12. Jason Murasko, 2015. "The Age Profile of the Income–Health Gradient: An Evaluation of Two Large Cohorts of Contemporary US Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 289-298, June.
    13. Gundersen, Craig & Kreider, Brent, 2009. "Bounding the effects of food insecurity on children's health outcomes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 971-983, September.
    14. Barbara Wolfe & Jessica Jakubowski & Robert Haveman & Marissa Courey, 2012. "The Income and Health Effects of Tribal Casino Gaming on American Indians," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(2), pages 499-524, May.
    15. Joseph Wolfe, 2015. "The Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Child and Adolescent Physical Health: An Organization and Systematic Comparison of Measures," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 39-58, August.
    16. Rasheda Khanam & Son Nghiem, 2016. "Family Income and Child Cognitive and Noncognitive Development in Australia: Does Money Matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 597-621, June.

  5. Jason Murasko, 2008. "Married Women’s Labor Supply and Spousal Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: Results from Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 391-406, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Azuara, Oliver, 2011. "Effect of universal health coverage on marriage, cohabitation and labor force participation," MPRA Paper 35074, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Suwen Pan & Cheng Fang & Roderick Rejesus, 2009. "Food Calorie Intake under Grain Price Uncertainty in Rural Nepal," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 137-148, June.
    3. Scott Hall & Shelley MacDermid, 2009. "A Typology of Dual Earner Marriages Based on Work and Family Arrangements," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 215-225, September.
    4. George Hondroyiannis, 2010. "Fertility Determinants and Economic Uncertainty: An Assessment Using European Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-50, March.
    5. Michael Quinn & Stephen Rubb, 2011. "Spouse Overeducation and Family Migration: Evidence from the US," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 36-45, March.
    6. Seonglim Lee & Jinkook Lee & Yunhee Chang, 2014. "Is Dual Income Costly for Married Couples? An Analysis of Household Expenditures," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 161-177, June.
    7. Kuo-Liang Chang & George Langelett & Andrew Waugh, 2011. "Health, Health Insurance, and Decision to Exit from Farming," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 356-372, June.
    8. Nan Astone & Jacinda Dariotis & Freya Sonenstein & Joseph Pleck & Kathryn Hynes, 2010. "Men’s Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 3-13, March.
    9. Boyle, Melissa A. & Lahey, Joanna N., 2016. "Spousal labor market effects from government health insurance: Evidence from a veterans affairs expansion," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 63-76.
    10. Jennifer Kohn & Susan Averett, 2014. "Can’t We Just Live Together? New Evidence on the Effect of Relationship Status on Health," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 295-312, September.
    11. Sandra Hofferth & Angela Pinzon, 2011. "Do Nonresidential Fathers’ Financial Support and Contact Improve Children’s Health?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 280-295, June.
    12. David Zimmer, 2009. "Insurance Arrangements Among Married Couples: Analysis of Benefit Substitution and Compensating Differentials," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 428-439, December.
    13. Nga Le Thi Quynh & Groot, Wim & Tomini, Sonila M. & Tomini, Florian, 2017. "Effects of health insurance on labour supply: A systematic review," MERIT Working Papers 017, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Jason Murasko should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.