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The Income and Health Effects of Tribal Casino Gaming on American Indians

  • Barbara Wolfe
  • Jessica Jakubowski

    ()

  • Robert Haveman
  • Marissa Courey

No abstract is available for this item.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s13524-012-0098-8
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Article provided by Springer & Population Association of America (PAA) in its journal Demography.

Volume (Year): 49 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 499-524

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Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:49:y:2012:i:2:p:499-524
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Web page: http://www.populationassociation.org/

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. William N. Evans & Julie H. Topoleski, 2002. "The Social and Economic Impact of Native American Casinos," NBER Working Papers 9198, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_economic_status_paper is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2003. "Socioeconomic Status and Child Health: Why Is the Relationship Stronger for Older Children?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1813-1823, December.
  4. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2003. "Healthy Living in Hard Times," IZA Discussion Papers 711, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. James Smith & Raynard Kington, 1997. "Demographic and economic correlates of health in old age," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(1), pages 159-170, February.
  6. Frijters, Paul & Haisken-DeNew, John P. & Shields, Michael A., 2005. "The causal effect of income on health: Evidence from German reunification," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 997-1017, September.
  7. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic status and health in childhood: the origins of the gradient," Working Papers 262, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  8. Simon Condliffe & Charles R. Link, 2008. "The Relationship between Economic Status and Child Health: Evidence from the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1605-18, September.
  9. Khanam, Rasheda & Nghiem, Hong Son & Connelly, Luke B., 2008. "Child Health and the Income Gradient: Evidence from Australia," MPRA Paper 13959, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Murasko, Jason E., 2008. "An evaluation of the age-profile in the relationship between household income and the health of children in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1489-1502, December.
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