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The Dynamics Of Income‐Related Health Inequality Among American Children

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  • Pinka Chatterji
  • Kajal Lahiri
  • Jingya Song

Abstract

We estimate and decompose income‐related inequality in child health in the USA and analyze its dynamics using the recently introduced health mobility index. Data come from the 1997, 2002, and 2007 waves of the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The findings show that income‐related child health inequality remains stable as children grow up and enter adolescence. The main factor underlying income‐related child health inequality is income itself, although other factors, such as maternal education, also play a role. Decomposition of income‐related health mobility indicates that health changes over time are more favorable to children with lower initial family incomes versus children with higher initial family incomes. However, offsetting this effect, our findings also suggest that changes in income ranking over time are positively related to children's subsequent health status. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Pinka Chatterji & Kajal Lahiri & Jingya Song, 2013. "The Dynamics Of Income‐Related Health Inequality Among American Children," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(5), pages 623-629, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:22:y:2013:i:5:p:623-629
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.2823
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.2823
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Giovanni Crea & Valentina Beretta, 2020. "Chronic diseases in Italy: Does socioeconomic status carry weight?," DEM Working Papers Series 187, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    3. Joan Costa-i-Font & Frank Cowell & Belén Saénz de Miera Juárez, 2017. "Does Insurance Expansion Alter Health Inequality and Mobility? Evidence from the Mexican Seguro Popular," CESifo Working Paper Series 6788, CESifo.
    4. Aristides dos Santos, Anderson Moreira & Perelman, Julian & Jacinto, Paulo de Andrade & Tejada, Cesar Augusto Oviedo & Barros, Aluísio J.D. & Bertoldi, Andréa D. & Matijasevich, Alicia & Santos, Iná S, 2019. "Income-related inequality and inequity in children’s health care: A longitudinal analysis using data from Brazil," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 224(C), pages 127-137.

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