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Children’s Health and Maternal Work Activity: Estimates under Alternative Disability Definitions

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  • Elizabeth T. Powers

Abstract

Past empirical findings indicate that children’s health problems reduce married mothers’ employment but are inconclusive in the case of female heads. These studies use diverse disability definitions, samples, and specifications. This paper uses pooled SIPP panels to investigate the impact of alternative disability measures on maternal market work. Negative effects of several disability definitions on female heads’ and wives’ employment and hours at a point in time are found. In contrast, while female heads’ growth in work hours over time and probabilities of entering employment appear adversely affected by child disability, there is no evidence for analogous effects on wives.

Suggested Citation

  • Elizabeth T. Powers, 2003. "Children’s Health and Maternal Work Activity: Estimates under Alternative Disability Definitions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(3).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:38:y:2003:i:3:p522-556
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rebecca M. Blank, 1989. "The Effect of Medical Need and Medicaid on AFDC Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(1), pages 54-87.
    2. Jean Kimmel, 1997. "Reducing the Welfare Dependence of Unmarried Mothers: Health-Related Employment Barriers and Policy Responses," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 151-163, Spring.
    3. Brent Kreider, 1999. "Latent Work Disability and Reporting Bias," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 734-769.
    4. Elizabeth T. Powers, 2001. "New Estimates of the Impact of Child Disability on Maternal Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 135-139, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kamp Dush, Claire M. & Schmeer, Kammi K. & Taylor, Miles, 2013. "Chaos as a social determinant of child health: Reciprocal associations?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 69-76.
    2. Warn N. Lekfuangfu & Nattavudh Powdthavee & Andrew E. Clark & George Ward, 2015. "Early Maternal Employment and Non-cognitive Outcomes in Early Childhood and Adolescence: Evidence from British Birth Cohort Data," PSE Working Papers halshs-01223336, HAL.
    3. Patrick Richard, 2016. "Children’s Mental Disorders and Their Mothers’ Earnings: Implications for the Affordable Care Act of 2010," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 156-171, June.
    4. Wasi, Nada & den Berg, Bernard van & Buchmueller, Thomas C., 2012. "Heterogeneous effects of child disability on maternal labor supply: Evidence from the 2000 US Census," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 139-154.
    5. Diego Amador & Mónica Pinilla-Roncancio, 2017. "The Effect of Child Disability on Parents' Labour Supply: Evidence from Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 015467, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    6. Peter Burton & Kelly Chen & Lynn Lethbridge & Shelley Phipps, 2017. "Child health and parental paid work," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 597-620, June.
    7. Burton, Peter & Lethbridge, Lynn & Phipps, Shelley, 2008. "Children with disabilities and chronic conditions and longer-term parental health," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1168-1186, June.
    8. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2008. "Maternal employment and adolescent development," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 958-983, October.
    9. Baum II, Charles L. & Ruhm, Christopher J., 2009. "Age, socioeconomic status and obesity growth," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 635-648, May.
    10. Meng-Wen Tsou & Jin-Tan Liu & Kuang-Hsien Wang, 2014. "Impact of Low Birth Weight Child on Maternal Labour Force Participation: Evidence from Taiwan," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 483-501, October.
    11. Mahmud, Mir, 2016. "Child Disability, Children’s Time with Mother and Maternal Employment," MPRA Paper 72816, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Anne DeCesaro & Jeffrey Hemmeter, 2009. "Unmet Health Care Needs and Medical OutofPocket Expenses of SSI Children," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 647047018c90447b90ef8dcca, Mathematica Policy Research.
    13. Paul Frijters & David W. Johnston & Manisha Shah & Michael A. Shields, 2009. "To Work or Not to Work? Child Development and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(3), pages 97-110, July.
    14. Jason Fletcher & Nicole Hair & Barbara Wolfe, 2012. "Am I my Brother's Keeper? Sibling Spillover Effects: The Case of Developmental Disabilities and Externalizing Behavior," CEPR Discussion Papers 668, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    15. Morrill, Melinda Sandler, 2011. "The effects of maternal employment on the health of school-age children," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 240-257, March.
    16. Kvist, Anette Primdal & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Simonsen, Marianne, 2013. "The importance of children's ADHD for parents' relationship stability and labor supply," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 30-38.
    17. Warn N. Lekfuangfu & Nattavudh Powdthavee & Andrew E. Clark & George Ward, 2015. "Early Maternal Employment and Non-cognitive Outcomes in Early Childhood and Adolescence: Evidence from British Birth Cohort Data," Working Papers halshs-01223336, HAL.
    18. repec:mpr:mprres:6338 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:iae:iaewps:wp2016n6 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. repec:afe:journl:v:19:y:2017:i:1:p:27-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. David Zimmer, 2007. "Child Health and Maternal Work Activity: The Role of Unobserved Heterogeneity," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 43-64, Winter.
    22. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0605-z is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Mark Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2005. "The Impact of Child SSI Enrollment on Household Outcomes: Evidence from the Survey of Income and Program Participation," NBER Working Papers 11568, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Anna Zhu, 2016. "Maternal Employment Trajectories and Caring for an Infant or Toddler with a Disability," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n06, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

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