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Kyle Thomas Moore

Personal Details

First Name:Kyle
Middle Name:Thomas
Last Name:Moore
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo795
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Affiliation

(50%) Capaciteitsgroep Algemene Economie
Faculteit der Economische Wetenschappen
Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam

Rotterdam, Netherlands
http://www.few.eur.nl/few//index.cfm/site/Erasmus%20School0f0.000000E+00conomics/pageid/6FA3409B-A995-84C6-AD843D684EAEBC03/
RePEc:edi:aeeurnl (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Tinbergen Instituut

Amsterdam, Netherlands
http://www.tinbergen.nl/
RePEc:edi:tinbenl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Moore, Kyle & Zhou, Chen, 2014. "The determinants of systemic importance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59289, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Kyle Moore & Pengfei Sun & Casper de Vries & Chen Zhou, 2013. "Shape Homogeneity and Scale Heterogeneity of Downside Tail Risk," Working Papers 13-13, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
  3. Moore, Kyle & Sun, Pengfei & de Vries, Casper G. & Zhou, Chen, 2013. "The cross-section of tail risks in stock returns," MPRA Paper 45592, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Moore, Kyle & Zhou, Chen, 2013. ""Too big to fail" or "Too non-traditional to fail"?: The determinants of banks' systemic importance," MPRA Paper 45589, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Moore, Kyle & Sun, Pengei & de Vries, Casper G. & Zhou, Chen, 2013. "The drivers of downside equity tail risk," MPRA Paper 45591, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Dolf Diemont & Kyle Moore & Aloy Soppe, 2016. "The Downside of Being Responsible: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tail Risk," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 137(2), pages 213-229, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Moore, Kyle & Zhou, Chen, 2014. "The determinants of systemic importance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59289, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Mateusz Mokrogulski, 2019. "Macroprudential policy in Poland," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 9511877, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    2. Abhinav Anand & John Cotter, 2019. "Integration Among US Banks," Working Papers 201913, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. Mihir Dash, 2021. "Non-Performing Loans and Systemic Risk of Indian Banks," Journal of Applied Management and Investments, Department of Business Administration and Corporate Security, International Humanitarian University, vol. 10(1), pages 10-20, April.

  2. Moore, Kyle & Sun, Pengfei & de Vries, Casper G. & Zhou, Chen, 2013. "The cross-section of tail risks in stock returns," MPRA Paper 45592, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Georges Hübner & Thomas Lejeune, 2015. "Portfolio choice and investor preferences : A semi-parametric approach based on risk horizon," Working Paper Research 289, National Bank of Belgium.
    2. Dolf Diemont & Kyle Moore & Aloy Soppe, 2016. "The Downside of Being Responsible: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tail Risk," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 137(2), pages 213-229, August.
    3. Cui, Hengxin & Tan, Ken Seng & Yang, Fan & Zhou, Chen, 2022. "Asymptotic analysis of portfolio diversification," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 302-325.
    4. Hübner, Georges & Lejeune, Thomas, 2021. "Mental accounts with horizon and asymmetry preferences," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 103(C).

  3. Moore, Kyle & Zhou, Chen, 2013. ""Too big to fail" or "Too non-traditional to fail"?: The determinants of banks' systemic importance," MPRA Paper 45589, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Qin, Xiao & Zhou, Chunyang, 2019. "Financial structure and determinants of systemic risk contribution," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 57(C).
    2. Giordana, Gastón & Ziegelmeyer, Michael, 2020. "Stress testing household balance sheets in Luxembourg," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 115-138.
    3. Gastón Andrés Giordana & Ingmar Schumacher, 2017. "An Empirical Study on the Impact of Basel III Standards on Banks’ Default Risk: The Case of Luxembourg," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 10(2), pages 1-21, April.
    4. Gurgone, Andrea & Iori, Giulia, 2020. "Macroprudential capital buffers in heterogeneous banking networks: Insights from an ABM with liquidity crises," BERG Working Paper Series 164, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    5. Van Son Lai & Xiaoxia Ye, 2020. "How Does the Stock Market View Bank Regulatory Capital Forbearance Policies?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 52(8), pages 1873-1907, December.
    6. Iryna Yanenkova & Yuliia Nehoda & Svetlana Drobyazko & Andrii Zavhorodnii & Lyudmyla Berezovska, 2021. "Modeling of Bank Credit Risk Management Using the Cost Risk Model," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 14(5), pages 1-15, May.
    7. X. Qin & X. Zhu, 2014. "Too non-traditional to fail? Determinants of systemic risk for BRICs banks," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 261-264, March.
    8. Van Son Lai & Xiaoxia Ye, 2019. "How Does the Stock Market View Bank Regulatory Capital Forbearance Policies?," Working Papers 2019-012, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    9. Masciantonio, Sergio, 2013. "Identifying, ranking and tracking systemically important financial institutions (SIFIs), from a global, EU and Eurozone perspective," MPRA Paper 46788, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Moore, Kyle & Sun, Pengei & de Vries, Casper G. & Zhou, Chen, 2013. "The drivers of downside equity tail risk," MPRA Paper 45591, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Dolf Diemont & Kyle Moore & Aloy Soppe, 2016. "The Downside of Being Responsible: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tail Risk," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 137(2), pages 213-229, August.

Articles

  1. Dolf Diemont & Kyle Moore & Aloy Soppe, 2016. "The Downside of Being Responsible: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tail Risk," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 137(2), pages 213-229, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Ozge Sahin & Karoline Bax & Claudia Czado & Sandra Paterlini, 2021. "Environmental, Social, Governance scores and the Missing pillar -- Why does missing information matter?," Papers 2106.15466, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2022.
    2. Bannier, Christina E. & Bofinger, Yannik & Rock, Björn, 2019. "Doing safe by doing good: ESG investing and corporate social responsibility in the U.S. and Europe," CFS Working Paper Series 621, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    3. Manuela Gomez‐Valencia & Maria Alejandra Gonzalez‐Perez & Ana Maria Gomez‐Trujillo, 2021. "The “Six Ws” of sustainable development risks," Business Strategy and the Environment, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(7), pages 3131-3144, November.
    4. Henk Berkman & Michelle Li & Helen Lu, 2021. "Trust and the value of CSR during the global financial crisis," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 61(3), pages 4955-4965, September.
    5. Ford, Jansson M. & Gehricke, Sebastian A. & Zhang, Jin E., 2022. "Option traders are concerned about climate risks: ESG ratings and short-term sentiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C).
    6. Wu, Chia-Ming & Hu, Jin-Li, 2019. "Can CSR reduce stock price crash risk? Evidence from China's energy industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 505-518.
    7. Chowdhury, Hasibul & Hodgson, Allan & Pathan, Shams, 2020. "Do external labour market incentives constrain bad news hoarding? The CEO's industry tournament and crash risk reduction," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    8. Wei Shi & Kevin Veenstra, 2021. "The Moderating Effect of Cultural Values on the Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Firm Performance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 89-107, November.
    9. Mohamed Arouri & Mathieu Gomes & Kuntara Pukthuanthong, 2019. "Corporate social responsibility and M&A uncertainty," Post-Print hal-02056009, HAL.
    10. Iftekhar Hasan & Hui Li & Haizhi Wang & Yun Zhu, 2021. "Do Affiliated Bankers on Board Enhance Corporate Social Responsibility? US Evidence," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(6), pages 1-27, March.
    11. Gregory, Richard Paul, 2022. "ESG activities and firm cash flow," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    12. Jean McGuire & Jana Oehmichen & Michael Wolff & Roman Hilgers, 2019. "Do Contracts Make Them Care? The Impact of CEO Compensation Design on Corporate Social Performance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 157(2), pages 375-390, June.
    13. Jingyan Zhang & Jan De Spiegeleer & Wim Schoutens, 2021. "Implied Tail Risk and ESG Ratings," Mathematics, MDPI, vol. 9(14), pages 1-16, July.
    14. Hussain, Tanveer & Shams, Syed, 2022. "Pre-deal differences in corporate social responsibility and acquisition performance," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 81(C).
    15. Dongyi Zhou & Rui Zhou, 2021. "ESG Performance and Stock Price Volatility in Public Health Crisis: Evidence from COVID-19 Pandemic," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(1), pages 1-15, December.
    16. Tzouvanas, Panagiotis & Kizys, Renatas & Chatziantoniou, Ioannis & Sagitova, Roza, 2020. "Environmental disclosure and idiosyncratic risk in the European manufacturing sector," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (5) 2013-03-30 2013-03-30 2013-03-30 2013-05-22 2015-02-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-BAN: Banking (2) 2013-03-30 2015-02-05
  3. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2013-03-30 2013-03-30
  4. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2013-03-30

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