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Lauren Eden Jones

Personal Details

First Name:Lauren
Middle Name:Eden
Last Name:Jones
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pjo315
Terminal Degree:2014 Department of Policy Analysis and Management; College of Human Ecology; Cornell University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Martin Prosperity Institute
Rotman School of Management
University of Toronto

Toronto, Canada
http://www.martinprosperity.org/

: 416.978.3499

416.978.3499
RePEc:edi:mptorca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Lauren E. Jones & Kevin S. Milligan & Mark Stabile, 2015. "Child Cash Benefits and Family Expenditures: Evidence from the National Child Benefit," NBER Working Papers 21101, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jones, Lauren E. & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2014. "Successful Scientific Replication and Extension of Levitt (2008): Child Seats Are Still No Safer than Seat Belts," IZA Discussion Papers 8590, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  3. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile & Lauren E. Jones, 2013. "Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?," NBER Working Papers 19105, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Currie, Janet & Stabile, Mark & Jones, Lauren, 2014. "Do stimulant medications improve educational and behavioral outcomes for children with ADHD?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 58-69.
  2. Jones, Lauren E. & Diekmann, Florian & Batte, Marvin T., 2010. "Staying in Touch through Extension: An Analysis of Farmers’ Use of Alternative Extension Information Products," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 42(2), pages 1-18, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Lauren E. Jones & Kevin S. Milligan & Mark Stabile, 2015. "Child Cash Benefits and Family Expenditures: Evidence from the National Child Benefit," NBER Working Papers 21101, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Lance Lochner & Youngmin Park, 2015. "Correlation, Consumption, Confusion, or Constraints: Why do Poor Children Perform so Poorly?," NBER Working Papers 21023, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Peter Burton & Shelley Phipps, 2017. "The Economic Well-Being of Canadian Children," LIS Working papers 704, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    3. Lance Lochner & Elizabeth Caucutt, 2012. "Early and Late Human Capital Investments, Borrowing Constraints, and the Family," 2012 Meeting Papers 128, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2018. "The Impact of Universal Child Benefits on Family Health and Behaviours," MPRA Paper 87480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Randall Akee & Emilia Simeonova & E. Jane Costello & William Copeland, 2015. "How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits and Behaviors?," NBER Working Papers 21562, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Claire McCartan & Aine Morrison & Lisa Bunting & Gavin Davidson & Jackie McIlroy, 2018. "Stripping the Wallpaper of Practice: Empowering Social Workers to Tackle Poverty," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(10), pages 1-16, October.

  2. Jones, Lauren E. & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2014. "Successful Scientific Replication and Extension of Levitt (2008): Child Seats Are Still No Safer than Seat Belts," IZA Discussion Papers 8590, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. D. Mark Anderson & Sina Sandholt, 2019. "Are Booster Seats More Effective than Child Safety Seats or Seat Belts at Reducing Traffic Fatalities among Children?," American Journal of Health Economics, MIT Press, vol. 5(1), pages 42-64, Winter.

  3. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile & Lauren E. Jones, 2013. "Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?," NBER Working Papers 19105, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Anna Chorniy & Janet Currie & Lyudmyla Sonchak, 2017. "Exploding Asthma and ADHD Caseloads: The Role of Medicaid Managed Care," NBER Working Papers 23983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dalsgaard, Søren & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Simonsen, Marianne, 2014. "Consequences of ADHD medication use for children's outcomes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 137-151.
    3. Chorniy, Anna, 2016. "Sex, Drugs, and ADHD: The Effects of ADHD Pharmacological Treatment on Teens' Risky Behaviors," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145766, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Shintaro Yamaguchi & Yukiko Asai & Ryo Kambayashi, 2017. "How Does Early Childcare Enrollment Affect Children, Parents, and Their Interactions?," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-05, McMaster University.
    5. Schwandt, Hannes & Wuppermann, Amelie, 2015. "The Youngest Get the Pill: ADHD Misdiagnosis and the Production of Education in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 9368, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Schwandt, Hannes & Wuppermann, Amelie, 2016. "The youngest get the pill: ADHD misdiagnosis in Germany, its regional correlates and international comparison," Munich Reprints in Economics 43485, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    7. Yamaguchi, Shintaro & Asai, Yukiko & Kambayashi, Ryo, 2017. "How Does Early Childcare Enrollment Affect Children, Parents, and Their Interactions?," Discussion Paper Series 656, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. Kreif, Noémi & Grieve, Richard & Hangartner, Dominik & Turner, Alex James & Nikolova, Silviya & Sutton, Matt, 2016. "Examination of the synthetic control method for evaluating health policies with multiple treated units," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65074, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Chorniy, Anna & Kitashima, Leah, 2016. "Sex, drugs, and ADHD: The effects of ADHD pharmacological treatment on teens' risky behaviors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 87-105.
    10. Cornaglia, Francesca & Crivellaro, Elena & McNally, Sandra, 2012. "Mental Health and Education Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 6452, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Yamaguchi, Shintaro & Asai, Yukiko & Kambayashi, Ryo, 2018. "How does early childcare enrollment affect children, parents, and their interactions?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 56-71.

Articles

  1. Currie, Janet & Stabile, Mark & Jones, Lauren, 2014. "Do stimulant medications improve educational and behavioral outcomes for children with ADHD?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 58-69.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Jones, Lauren E. & Diekmann, Florian & Batte, Marvin T., 2010. "Staying in Touch through Extension: An Analysis of Farmers’ Use of Alternative Extension Information Products," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 42(2), pages 1-18, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Lohr, Luanne & Park, Timothy, 2012. "Demand for Private Marketing Expertise by Organic Farmers: A Quantile Analysis Based on Counts," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(2), pages 157-171, May.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2013-06-16 2014-11-28
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2014-11-28

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