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Unconditional cash transfers and parental obesity

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  • Lebihan, Laetitia
  • Mao Takongmo, Charles-Olivier

Abstract

In this study, we evaluate the impact of unconditional family cash transfers on the body mass index (BMI) and obesity of parents. Our approach is based on the implementation of the Universal Child Care Benefit in 2006 for all children in Canada under 6 years of age. We show that the reform caused decreases in BMI and the prevalence of overweight and obesity in mothers with young children. We also report larger changes at the upper tail of the distribution of BMI in both lower-educated mothers and single mothers. In terms of fathers, we find that the policy had no impact on weight outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Lebihan, Laetitia & Mao Takongmo, Charles-Olivier, 2019. "Unconditional cash transfers and parental obesity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 224(C), pages 116-126.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:224:y:2019:i:c:p:116-126
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.01.043
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Randall Akee & Emilia Simeonova & William Copeland & Adrian Angold & E. Jane Costello, 2013. "Young Adult Obesity and Household Income: Effects of Unconditional Cash Transfers," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 1-28, April.
    2. Lebihan, Laetitia & Mao Takongmo, Charles-Olivier, 2018. "The impact of universal child benefits on family health and behaviours," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(4), pages 415-427.
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    Cited by:

    1. LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2019. "The Effect of Paid Parental Leave on Breastfeeding, Parental Health and Behavior," MPRA Paper 95719, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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