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Ani Harutyunyan

Personal Details

First Name:Ani
Middle Name:
Last Name:Harutyunyan
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RePEc Short-ID:pha1114
http://AniHarutyunyan.com

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Knack,Stephen & Parks,Bradley Christopher & Harutyunyan,Ani & DiLorenzo,Matthew, 2020. "How Does the World Bank Influence the Development Policy Priorities of Low-Income and Lower-Middle Income Countries ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9225, The World Bank.
  2. Harutyunyan, Ani & Özak, Ömer, 2016. "Culture, Diffusion, and Economic Development: The Problem of Observational Equivalence," MPRA Paper 80228, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2017.
  3. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Ani Harutyunyan, 2016. "Do migrants think differently? Evidence from East European and post-Soviet states," LICOS Discussion Papers 38116, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  4. Ani Harutyunyan & Ömer Özak, 2016. "Culture, Diffusion, and Economic Development," Departmental Working Papers 1606, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Ani Harutyunyan, 2020. "National Identity and Public Goods Provision," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 62(1), pages 1-33, March.
  2. Harutyunyan, Ani & Özak, Ömer, 2017. "Culture, diffusion, and economic development: The problem of observational equivalence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 94-100.
  3. Ani Harutyunyan, 2017. "Two state disputes and outside intervention: the case of Nagorno–Karabakh conflict," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 7(1), pages 69-93, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Harutyunyan, Ani & Özak, Ömer, 2016. "Culture, Diffusion, and Economic Development: The Problem of Observational Equivalence," MPRA Paper 80228, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2017.

    Cited by:

    1. Jäggi, Adrian & Legge, Stefan & Schmid, Lukas, 2017. "Dyadic Value Distance: Determinants and Consequences," Economics Working Paper Series 1718, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    2. Goran Maksimović & Srđan Jović & David Jovović & Marina Jovović, 2019. "RETRACTED ARTICLE: Analyses of Economic Development Based on Different Factors," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 53(3), pages 1103-1109, March.
    3. Andrew Dickens, 2018. "Population relatedness and cross-country idea flows: evidence from book translations," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 367-386, December.

  2. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Ani Harutyunyan, 2016. "Do migrants think differently? Evidence from East European and post-Soviet states," LICOS Discussion Papers 38116, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.

    Cited by:

    1. Docquier, Frédéric & Tansel, Aysit & Turati, Riccardo, 2017. "Do emigrants self-select along cultural traits? Evidence from the MENA countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 146, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Jan Fidrmuc, 2018. "Comfort and Conformity: A Culture-based Theory of Migration," LICOS Discussion Papers 40518, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.

  3. Ani Harutyunyan & Ömer Özak, 2016. "Culture, Diffusion, and Economic Development," Departmental Working Papers 1606, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Ani Harutyunyan & Ömer Özak, 2017. "Culture, Diffusion, and Economic Development: The Problem of Observational Equivalence," Departmental Working Papers 1702, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
    2. Oded Galor & Omer Ozak & Assaf Sarid, 2016. "Origins and Consequences of Lanquage Structures," Working Papers 2016-7, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Oded Galor & Ömer Özak & Assaf Sarid, 2016. "Geographical Origins and Economic Consequences of Language Structures," Departmental Working Papers 1609, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
    4. Jäggi, Adrian & Legge, Stefan & Schmid, Lukas, 2017. "Dyadic Value Distance: Determinants and Consequences," Economics Working Paper Series 1718, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    5. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Ani Harutyunyan, 2016. "Do migrants think differently? Evidence from East European and post-Soviet states," Working Papers of Department of Economics, Leuven 551444, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), Department of Economics, Leuven.
    6. Oded Galor & Omer Ozak & Assaf Sarid, 2018. "Geographical Origins of Language Structures ," Working Papers 2018-5, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    7. Giampaolo Lecce & Laura Ogliari, 2017. "Institutional Transplant and Cultural Proximity: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia," Working Papers 598, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    8. Andrew Dickens, 2018. "Population relatedness and cross-country idea flows: evidence from book translations," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 367-386, December.

Articles

  1. Harutyunyan, Ani & Özak, Ömer, 2017. "Culture, diffusion, and economic development: The problem of observational equivalence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 94-100.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (7) 2016-04-23 2016-05-14 2016-09-25 2016-09-25 2016-10-09 2017-07-23 2017-10-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (6) 2016-04-23 2016-05-14 2016-09-25 2016-10-09 2017-07-23 2017-10-08. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (5) 2016-05-14 2016-09-25 2016-10-09 2017-07-23 2017-10-08. Author is listed
  4. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (4) 2016-04-23 2016-09-25 2016-10-09 2017-10-08. Author is listed
  5. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (3) 2016-05-14 2016-09-25 2016-10-09. Author is listed
  6. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2016-09-25 2016-10-09
  7. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2016-10-09
  8. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2020-05-25
  9. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2016-05-14

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