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Guido Matias Cortes

Personal Details

First Name:Guido Matias
Middle Name:
Last Name:Cortes
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco712
http://sites.google.com/site/gmatiascortes/
Terminal Degree:2012 Vancouver School of Economics; University of British Columbia (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) Department of Economics
York University

Toronto, Canada
http://econ.laps.yorku.ca/

: (416) 736-5083
(416) 736-5987
4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3
RePEc:edi:dyorkca (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis (RCEA)

Rimini, Italy
http://www.rcea.org/

: +390541434142
+39054155431
Via Patara, 3, 47921 Rimini (RN)
RePEc:edi:rcfeait (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Nir Jaimovich & Henry Siu & Guido Matias Cortes, 2017. "The End of Men and Rise of Women in the High-Skilled Labor Market," 2017 Meeting Papers 809, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2016. "Disappearing Routine Jobs: Who, How, and Why?," NBER Working Papers 22918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Cortes, Guido Matias & Salvatori, Andrea, 2016. "Delving into the Demand Side: Changes in Workplace Specialization and Job Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 10120, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Guido Matías Cortés & Manuel Hidalgo-Pérez, 2015. "Changes in the Return to Skills and the Variance of Unobserved Ability," Working Papers 15.15, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
  5. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Christopher J. Nekarda & Henry E. Siu, 2014. "The Micro and Macro of Disappearing Routine Jobs: A Flows Approach," NBER Working Papers 20307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Guido Matias Cortes & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2014. "The Costs of Occupational Mobility: An Aggregate Analysis," Working Papers 2014-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  7. Guido Matias Cortes, 2012. "Where Have the Routine Workers Gone? A Study of Polarization Using Panel Data," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1224, Economics, The University of Manchester.

Articles

  1. Cortes, Guido Matias & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E., 2017. "Disappearing routine jobs: Who, how, and why?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-87.
  2. Guido Matias Cortes, 2016. "Where Have the Middle-Wage Workers Gone? A Study of Polarization Using Panel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 63-105.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Nir Jaimovich & Henry Siu & Guido Matias Cortes, 2017. "The End of Men and Rise of Women in the High-Skilled Labor Market," 2017 Meeting Papers 809, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Bhalotra, S.; & Karlsson, M.; & Nilsson, T.; & Schwarz, N.;, 2018. "Infant Health, Cognitive Performance and Earnings: Evidence from Inception of the Welfare State in Sweden," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

  2. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2016. "Disappearing Routine Jobs: Who, How, and Why?," NBER Working Papers 22918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2017. "High-Skilled Immigration, STEM Employment, and Non-Routine-Biased Technical Change," NBER Chapters,in: High-Skilled Migration to the United States and its Economic Consequences National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Gordon Hanson & Chen Liu & Craig McIntosh, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of U.S. Low-Skilled Immigration," NBER Working Papers 23753, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Fabio Cerina & Alessio Moro & Michelle Petersen Rendall, 2017. "The role of gender in employment polarization," ECON - Working Papers 250, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Gordon Hanson & Chen Liu & Craig McIntosh, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of U.S. Low-Skilled Immigration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 48(1 (Spring), pages 83-168.
    5. Cerina, Fabio & Moro, Alessio & Petersen Rendall, Michelle, 2017. "The role of gender in employment polarization," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86170, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Aum, Sangmin & Lee, Sang Yoon (Tim) & Shin, Yongseok, 2018. "Computerizing Industries and Routinizing Jobs: Explaining Trends in Aggregate Productivity," CEPR Discussion Papers 12747, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Muendler, Marc-Andreas, 2017. "Trade, technology, and prosperity: An account of evidence from a labor-market perspective," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2017-15, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    8. Hinh T. Dinh, 2017. "Jobs, Industrialization, and Globalization," Books & Reports, OCP Policy Center, number 16, June.

  3. Cortes, Guido Matias & Salvatori, Andrea, 2016. "Delving into the Demand Side: Changes in Workplace Specialization and Job Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 10120, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Gunther Tichy, 2018. "Skills Challenges Polarised by Digitalisation?," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 91(3), pages 177-190, March.
    2. Daniel Schäfer & Carl Singleton, 2017. "Recent changes in British wage inequality: Evidence from firms and occupations," ESE Discussion Papers 277, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.

  4. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Christopher J. Nekarda & Henry E. Siu, 2014. "The Micro and Macro of Disappearing Routine Jobs: A Flows Approach," NBER Working Papers 20307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2017. "High-Skilled Immigration, STEM Employment, and Non-Routine-Biased Technical Change," NBER Chapters,in: High-Skilled Migration to the United States and its Economic Consequences National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Foote, Christopher L. & Ryan, Richard W., 2014. "Labor market polarization over the business cycle," Working Papers 14-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    3. Joanne Lindley & Stephen Machin, 2016. "The Rising Postgraduate Wage Premium," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 281-306, April.
    4. Pau S. Pujolas & Zachary L. Mahone, 2017. "Optimal Design and Quantitative Evaluation of the Minimum Wage," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-15, McMaster University.
    5. Rahul Anand & Siddharth Kothari & Naresh Kumar, 2016. "South Africa; Labor Market Dynamics and Inequality," IMF Working Papers 16/137, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Salvatori, Andrea, 2015. "The Anatomy of Job Polarisation in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 9193, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Carlos Carrillo-Tudela & Bart Hobijn & Powen She & Ludo Visschers, 2014. "The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the UK (first version)," ESE Discussion Papers 246, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    8. Gregory, Terry & Salomons, Anna & Zierahn, Ulrich, 2016. "Racing with or against the machine? Evidence from Europe," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-053, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos & Hobijn, Bart & She, Powen & Visschers, Ludo, 2014. "The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the U.K," Working Paper Series 2014-21, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    10. Ross, Matthew B., 2017. "Routine-biased technical change: Panel evidence of task orientation and wage effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 198-214.
    11. James Harrigan & Ariell Reshef & Farid Toubal, 2016. "The March of the Techies: Technology, Trade, and Job Polarization in France, 1994-2007," Working Papers 2016-15, CEPII research center.
    12. Sébastien Bock, 2018. "Job Polarization and Unskilled Employment Losses in France," PSE Working Papers halshs-01513037, HAL.
    13. Nellie Zhao & Henry Hyatt & Isabel Cairo, 2016. "The U.S. Job Ladder and the Low-Wage Jobs of the New Millennium," 2016 Meeting Papers 1414, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Muendler, Marc-Andreas, 2017. "Trade, technology, and prosperity: An account of evidence from a labor-market perspective," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2017-15, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    15. Joao Alfredo Galindo da Fonseca & Giovanni Gallipoli & Yaniv Yedid-Levi, 2017. "Match Quality, Contractual Sorting and Wage Cyclicality," Working Papers 2017-076, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    16. David Autor, 2014. "Polanyi's Paradox and the Shape of Employment Growth," NBER Working Papers 20485, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. David H. Autor, 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 3-30, Summer.

  5. Guido Matias Cortes & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2014. "The Costs of Occupational Mobility: An Aggregate Analysis," Working Papers 2014-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Watts & Jose V. Rodriguez Mora & David Comerford, 2017. "The Rise of Meritocracy and the Inheritance of Advantage," 2017 Meeting Papers 1644, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Yaniv Yedid-Levi & Giovanni Gallipoli & Joao Alfredo Galindo da Fonseca, 2016. "Revisiting the Relationship Between Unemployment and Wages," 2016 Meeting Papers 541, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Brant Abbott & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2015. "Human Capital Spillovers and the Geography of Intergenerational Mobility," 2015 Meeting Papers 319, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Kondo, Ayako & Naganuma, Saori, 2015. "Inter-industry labor reallocation and task distance," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 127-147.
    5. Artuc, Erhan & McLaren, John, 2012. "Trade policy and wage inequality : a structural analysis with occupational and sectoral mobility," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6194, The World Bank.
    6. Bauer, Anja, 2015. "Reallocation patterns across occupations," IAB Discussion Paper 201526, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    7. Xiaodong Zhu & Trevor Tombe, 2015. "Trade, Migration and Regional Income Differences: Evidence from China," 2015 Meeting Papers 1534, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Joao Alfredo Galindo da Fonseca & Giovanni Gallipoli & Yaniv Yedid-Levi, 2017. "Match Quality, Contractual Sorting and Wage Cyclicality," Working Papers 2017-076, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    9. Jacob Wong, 2017. "Aggregate Reallocation Shocks, Occupational Employment and Distance," School of Economics Working Papers 2017-09, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    10. Trevor Tombe & Xiaodong Zhu, 2015. "Trade, Migration and Productivity: A Quantitative Analysis of China," Working Papers tecipa-542, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.

  6. Guido Matias Cortes, 2012. "Where Have the Routine Workers Gone? A Study of Polarization Using Panel Data," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1224, Economics, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2012. "The Trend is the Cycle: Job Polarization and Jobless Recoveries," NBER Working Papers 18334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Fedorets, Alexandra, 2014. "Closing the Gender Pay Gap and Individual Task Profiles: Women s Advantages from Technological Progress," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100362, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Guido Matias Cortes & Manuel Alejandro Hidalgo, 2015. "Changes in the Return to Skills and the Variance of Unobserved Ability," Working Paper series 15-45, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    4. Foote, Christopher L. & Ryan, Richard W., 2014. "Labor market polarization over the business cycle," Working Papers 14-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2018. "The "End of Men" and Rise of Women in the High-Skilled Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 24274, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Richard Blundell & David A. Green & Wenchao (Michelle) Jin, 2016. "The UK wage premium puzzle: how did a large increase in university graduates leave the education premium unchanged?," IFS Working Papers W16/01, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    7. Maté Fodor, 2016. "Essays on Education, Wages and Technology," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/239691, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    8. Feng, Andy & Graetz, Georg, 2015. "Rise of the Machines: The Effects of Labor-Saving Innovations on Jobs and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 8836, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Manuel Hidalgo-Perez & Benedetto Molinari, 2015. "Learning New Technology: The Polarization of the Wage Distribution," Working Paper series 15-42, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    10. Aleksandra Skorupinska & Joan Torrent-Sellens, 2017. "ICT, Innovation and Productivity: Evidence Based on Eastern European Manufacturing Companies," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(2), pages 768-788, June.
    11. Christian vom Lehn, 2015. "Labor Market Polarization, the Decline of Routine Work, and Technological Change: A Quantitative Evaluation," 2015 Meeting Papers 151, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Julien Albertini & Jean Olivier Hairault & Francois Langot & Thepthida Sopraseuth, 2016. "Aggregate Employment, Job Polarization and Inequalities: A Transatlantic Perspective," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2016-014, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    13. Tobias Maier & Caroline Neuber-Pohl & Anke Mönnig & Gerd Zika & Michael Kalinowski, 2017. "Modelling reallocation processes in long-term labour market projections
      [Modellierung von Anpassungsprozessen in langfristigen Arbeitsmarktprojektionen]
      ," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 50(1), pages 67-90, August.
    14. Ross, Matthew B., 2017. "Routine-biased technical change: Panel evidence of task orientation and wage effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 198-214.
    15. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Licklederer, Stefanie & Zwiener, Hanna, 2015. "Mobility across firms and occupations among graduates from apprenticeship," ZEW Discussion Papers 15-022, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    16. Bachmann, Ronald & Bechara, Peggy & Vonnahme, Christina, 2017. "Occupational mobility in Europe: Extent, determinants and consequences," Ruhr Economic Papers 732, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    17. Michael J. Boehm, 2013. "Has Job Polarization Squeezed the Middle Class? Evidence from the Allocation of Talents," CEP Discussion Papers dp1215, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    18. Aleksandra Parteka & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2017. "Workers, Firms and Task Heterogeneity in International Trade Analysis: An Example of Wage Effects of Trade Within GVC," Entrepreneurial Business and Economics Review, Centre for Strategic and International Entrepreneurship of the Faculty of Economics and International Relations at the Cracow University of Economics., vol. 5(2), pages 9-25.
    19. Francisco M. Gonzalez & Yu Chen & Matthew Doyle, 2017. "Mismatch As Choice," Working Papers 1702, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised May 2017.
      • Yu (Sonja) Chen & Matthew Doyle & Francisco M. Gonzalez, "undated". "Mismatch as choice," Working Papers 2017-04, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 15 May 2017.
    20. Hee-Seung Yang & Myungkyu Shim, 2013. "Job Polarization : Market Responses to Interindustry Wage Differentials," 2013 Meeting Papers 1200, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    21. Lucas van der Velde, 2017. "Phasing out: routine tasks and retirement," GRAPE Working Papers 23, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    22. J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina & Jorge, Velilla, 2017. "Leisure and effort at work: incorporating self-employment into urban markets," MPRA Paper 77972, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Gustavsson, Magnus, 2017. "Is Job Polarization a Recent Phenomenon? Evidence from Sweden, 1950–2013, and a Comparison to the United States," Working Paper Series 2017:14, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    24. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Christopher J. Nekarda & Henry E. Siu, 2014. "The Micro and Macro of Disappearing Routine Jobs: A Flows Approach," NBER Working Papers 20307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. Albertini, Julien & Hairault, Jean-Olivier & Langot, François & Sopraseuth, Thepthida, 2017. "A Tale of Two Countries: A Story of the French and US Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 11013, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    26. Naticchioni, Paolo & Ragusa, Giuseppe & Massari, Riccardo, 2014. "Unconditional and Conditional Wage Polarization in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 8465, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    27. Jacob Wong, 2012. "Aggregate Reallocation Shocks and the Dynamics of Occupational Mobility and Wage Inequality," School of Economics Working Papers 2012-04, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    28. Boehm, Michael J., 2013. "Has job polarization squeezed the middle class? Evidence from the allocation of talents," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51554, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    29. Grafström, Jonas, 2017. "Technological Change and Wage Polarization – The Illiberal Populist Response," Ratio Working Papers 294, The Ratio Institute.
    30. Vallizadeh, Ehsan & Muysken, Joan & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2016. "Offshoring medium-skill tasks, low-skill unemployment and the skill-wage structure," MERIT Working Papers 070, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    31. Böhm, Michael, 2014. "The Wage Effects of Job Polarization: Evidence from the Allocation of Talents," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100547, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    32. Giovanni Gallipoli & Matias Cortes, 2014. "The Barriers to Occupational Mobility: An Aggregate Analysis," 2014 Meeting Papers 480, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    33. Cortes, Guido Matias & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E., 2017. "Disappearing routine jobs: Who, how, and why?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-87.
    34. Cortes, Guido Matias & Salvatori, Andrea, 2016. "Delving into the Demand Side: Changes in Workplace Specialization and Job Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 10120, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    35. Jacob Wong, 2017. "Aggregate Reallocation Shocks, Occupational Employment and Distance," School of Economics Working Papers 2017-09, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    36. Piotr Lewandowski & Roma Keister & Wojciech Hardy & Szymon Gorka, 2017. "Routine and ageing? The Intergenerational Divide In The Deroutinisation Of Jobs In Europe," IBS Working Papers 01/2017, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    37. Guido Matias Cortes & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2014. "The Costs of Occupational Mobility: An Aggregate Analysis," Working Paper series 17_14, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    38. Lucas van der Velde, 2017. "Within occupation wage dispersion and the task content of jobs," GRAPE Working Papers 22, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    39. Jaewon Jung, 2015. "Technology, Skill, and Growth in a Global Economy," THEMA Working Papers 2015-08, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    40. Wielandt, Hanna & Senftleben, Charlotte, 2012. "The Polarization of Employment in German Local Labor Markets," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62063, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    41. Julien Albertini & Jean Olivier Hairault & François Langot & Thepthida Sopraseuth, "undated". "Frictions or deadlocks? Job polarization with search and matching frictions," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2015-051, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    42. Shim, Myungkyu & Yang, Hee-Seung, 2016. "New stylized facts on occupational employment and their implications: Evidence from consistent employment data," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 402-415.
    43. Böhm, Michael Johannes, 2017. "The Price of Polarization: Estimating Task Prices under Routine-Biased Technical Change," IZA Discussion Papers 11220, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Articles

  1. Cortes, Guido Matias & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E., 2017. "Disappearing routine jobs: Who, how, and why?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-87.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Guido Matias Cortes, 2016. "Where Have the Middle-Wage Workers Gone? A Study of Polarization Using Panel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 63-105. See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 13 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2014-07-28 2014-07-28 2014-08-16 2017-01-01. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (3) 2014-07-28 2015-12-28 2016-08-21
  3. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2014-07-28 2015-12-28 2017-01-01
  4. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2017-01-01 2017-10-29
  5. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2016-08-07
  6. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2017-10-29
  7. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2017-10-29
  8. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2016-08-07
  9. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2016-08-21
  10. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2017-01-01
  11. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2016-09-18
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2016-08-21

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