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Financial and Fiscal Instruments for Catastrophe Risk Management : Addressing Losses from Flood Hazards in Central Europe

Author

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  • John Pollner

Abstract

This report addresses the large flood exposures of Central Europe and proposes efficient financial and risk transfer mechanisms to mitigate fiscal losses from natural catastrophes. In particular, the Visegrad countries (V-4) of Central Europe, namely, Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, and the Slovak Republic, have such tremendous potential flood damages that reliance on budgetary appropriations or even European Union (EU) funds in such circumstances becomes ineffective and does not provide needed cash funds for the quick response and recovery needed to minimize economic disruptions. The report is primarily addressed to the governments of the region, which should build into their fiscal planning the necessary contingent funding mechanisms, based on their exposures. The report is addressed to finance ministries and also to the insurance and securities regulators and the private insurance and capital markets, which may all play a role in the proposed mechanisms. An arrangement using a multi-country pool with a hazard-triggered insurance payout mechanism complemented by contingent financing is proposed, to better manage these risks and avoid major fiscal volatility and disruption.

Suggested Citation

  • John Pollner, 2012. "Financial and Fiscal Instruments for Catastrophe Risk Management : Addressing Losses from Flood Hazards in Central Europe," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 9381, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:9381
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/9381/709110PUB0EPI0067869B09780821395790.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank Group, 2014. "Insurance against Climate Change : Financial Disaster Risk Management and Insurance Options for Climate Change Adaptation in Bulgaria," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18940, The World Bank.
    2. repec:prg:jnlefa:v:2017:y:2017:i:4:id:200:p:47-66 is not listed on IDEAS

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