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Transfer Payments And Upper Secondary School Outcomes: The Case Of Low-Income Female Students In Thailand

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  • JESSICA VECHBANYONGRATANA

    () (Faculty of Economics, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand)

  • SASIWIMON WARUNSIRI PAWEENAWAT

    () (School of Economics, University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, 126/1 Vibhavadee-Rangsit Road, Dindaeng Bangkok 10400, Thailand)

Abstract

This study assesses the impact of cash transfers to low-income female Thai students on improving upper secondary school outcomes, as measured by grade point average (GPA) and transition to tertiary education. Utilizing official records from a charity organization providing substantial cash transfers to secondary students and student records from participating schools, we find the transfers have no effect on improving recipients’ GPAs compared to non-recipients. However, the scholarship recipients are 22% more likely to transition to university education than non-recipients and the presence of scholarship recipients in the classroom increases the likelihood of female non-recipients to attend university.

Suggested Citation

  • Jessica Vechbanyongratana & Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat, 2015. "Transfer Payments And Upper Secondary School Outcomes: The Case Of Low-Income Female Students In Thailand," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 60(05), pages 1-19, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:60:y:2015:i:05:n:s0217590815500824
    DOI: 10.1142/S0217590815500824
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    References listed on IDEAS

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