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Who has standing in cost-benefit analysis?

Author

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  • William N. Trumbull

    (Assistant Professor of Economics at West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia)

Abstract

The issues involved in deciding whose preferences are to be counted in cost-benefit analysis are often misunderstood or controversial. This paper attempts to resolve the issues in a number of particular cases by looking to the fundamental value assumptions underlying cost-benefit analysis. Cost-benefit analysis is useful only to the extent that there exists a general consensus that the value assumptions are legitimate. Certain implications of the value assumptions prove useful in deciding what preferences have standing.

Suggested Citation

  • William N. Trumbull, 1990. "Who has standing in cost-benefit analysis?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 201-218.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:9:y:1990:i:2:p:201-218
    DOI: 10.2307/3325412
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/3325412
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. P.-Y. Henin & Jean-Paul Pollin, 1983. "Introduction," Post-Print halshs-00288183, HAL.
    3. James M. Buchanan, 1962. "The relevance of Pareto optimality," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 6(4), pages 341-354, December.
    4. A. Meltzer & Peter Ordeshook & Thomas Romer, 1983. "Introduction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 1-5, January.
    5. David A. Long & Charles D. Mallar & Craig Thornton, 1981. "Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of the Job Corps," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ba3a91e82f5f43b48bab18ea4, Mathematica Policy Research.
    6. A. P. Thirlwall, 1983. "Introduction," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 341-344, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher, Robert & Zeckhauser, Richard Jay, 2011. "The Methodology of Normative Policy Analysis," Scholarly Articles 4669672, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Richard O. Zerbe, 2013. "Ethical benefit–cost analysis as art and science: ten rules for benefit–cost analysis," Chapters,in: Principles and Standards for Benefit–Cost Analysis, chapter 8, pages 264-293 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Richard W. Dunford & F. Reed Johnson & Emily S. West, 1997. "Whose Losses Count In Natural Resource Damages?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(4), pages 77-87, October.
    4. Campbell, Harry F. & Brown, Richard P.C., 2005. "A multiple account framework for cost-benefit analysis," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 23-32.
    5. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:71-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Robert, Christopher LeBaron & Zeckhauser, Richard Jay, 2010. "The Methodology of Positive Policy Analysis," Scholarly Articles 4450129, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    7. Therese C. Grijalva & Robert P. Berrens & Alok K. Bohara & Paul M. Jakus & W. Douglass Shaw, 2002. "Valuing the Loss of Rock Climbing Access in Wilderness Areas: A National-Level, Random-Utility Model," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(1), pages 103-120.
    8. Aidan R. Vining, 2016. "What Is Public Agency Strategic Analysis (PASA) and How Does It Differ from Public Policy Analysis and Firm Strategy Analysis?," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-31, December.
    9. Jonathan A. Lesser & Richard O. Zerbe, 1995. "What Can Economic Analysis Contribute To The 'Sustainability' Debate?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 13(3), pages 88-100, July.
    10. Grant, Darren, 2016. "A structural analysis of U.S. drunk driving policy," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 14-22.
    11. Veisten, Knut & Stefan, Christian & Winkelbauer, Martin, 2013. "Standing in cost-benefit analysis of road safety measures: A case of speed enforcement vs. speed change," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 269-274.

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