IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mpr/mprres/ba3a91e82f5f43b48bab18ea4c197ae9.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of the Job Corps

Author

Listed:
  • David A. Long
  • Charles D. Mallar
  • Craig Thornton

Abstract

Social programs have a wide variety of effects and often have the explicit objective of improving the economic status of the people they serve. In order to be useful to policymakers, benefit—cost analysis of social programs should explicitly take account of these two important program features.

Suggested Citation

  • David A. Long & Charles D. Mallar & Craig Thornton, 1981. "Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of the Job Corps," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ba3a91e82f5f43b48bab18ea4, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:ba3a91e82f5f43b48bab18ea4c197ae9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2307/3324110/abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Loeb, Susanna & Bridges, Margaret & Bassok, Daphna & Fuller, Bruce & Rumberger, Russell W., 2007. "How much is too much? The influence of preschool centers on children's social and cognitive development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 52-66, February.
    2. Cora Maas & Tom Snijders, 2003. "The Multilevel Approach to Repeated Measures for Complete and Incomplete Data," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 71-89, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Cunha, Flavio & Heckman, James J. & Lochner, Lance, 2006. "Interpreting the Evidence on Life Cycle Skill Formation," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    3. Burt S. Barnow & Jeffrey Smith, 2015. "Employment and Training Programs," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 2, pages 127-234 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Loomis John B, 2011. "Incorporating Distributional Issues into Benefit Cost Analysis: Why, How, and Two Empirical Examples Using Non-market Valuation," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-24, January.
    5. Lance Lochner, 2010. "Education Policy and Crime," NBER Chapters,in: Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs, pages 465-515 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. John B. Loomis, 2013. "Incorporating distributional issues into benefit–cost analysis: why, how, and two empirical examples using non-market valuation," Chapters,in: Principles and Standards for Benefit–Cost Analysis, chapter 9, pages 294-316 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. William N. Trumbull, 1990. "Who has standing in cost-benefit analysis?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 201-218.
    8. Anne Gordon, "undated". "Evaluation of the Minority Female Single Parent Demonstration Volume III: Technical Report on the Benefit-Cost Analysis," Mathematica Policy Research Reports b93748a6814f44ed8dd2c507c, Mathematica Policy Research.
    9. Schmid, Günther & Schömann, Klaus & Schütz, Holger, 1997. "Evaluierung und Arbeitsmarktpolitik: Eine analytischer Bezugsrahmen am Beispiel des arbeitsmarktpolitischen Rahmenprogramms in Berlin," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment FS I 97-204, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    10. Anthony Boardman & Aidan Vining & W. G. Waters, 1993. "Costs and benefits through bureaucratic lenses: Example of a highway project," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 532-555.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Benefits and Cost; Job Corps;

    JEL classification:

    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:ba3a91e82f5f43b48bab18ea4c197ae9. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joanne Pfleiderer) or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/mathius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.