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A Multiple Account Framework For Cost-Benefit Analysis



The paper presents a spreadsheet-based multiple account approach to cost-benefit analysis which incorporates all the usual concerns of cost-benefit analysts such as shadow-pricing to account for market failure, distribution of net benefits, sensitivity and risk analysis, cost of public funds, and environmental effects. The approach offers a number of advantages to both analysts and decision-makers, including transparency, a check on internal consistency and a detailed summary of project net benefits disaggregated by stakeholder group.

Suggested Citation

  • Prof Harry Campbell & Assoc Prof Richard Brown, 2003. "A Multiple Account Framework For Cost-Benefit Analysis," Discussion Papers Series 328, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:328

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. William N. Trumbull, 1990. "Reply to whittington and macRae," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 548-550.
    2. Dale Whittington & Duncan Macrae, 1990. "Comment: Judgments about who has standing in cost-benefit analysis," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 536-547.
    3. Dale Whittington & Duncan MacRae, 1986. "The issue of standing in cost-benefit analysis," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(4), pages 665-682.
    4. Willig, Robert D, 1976. "Consumer's Surplus without Apology," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(4), pages 589-597, September.
    5. Campbell, H F & Bond, K A, 1997. "The Cost of Public Funds in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 73(220), pages 22-34, March.
    6. Richard O. Zerbe, 1991. "Comment: Does benefit cost analysis stand alone? rights and standing," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 96-105.
    7. William N. Trumbull, 1990. "Who has standing in cost-benefit analysis?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 201-218.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lawrence, C, 2009. "Identifying an Australian 'Shadow' Benefit / Cost Ratio for Public Projects," MPRA Paper 13336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mushtaq, Shahbaz & Khan, Shahbaz & Dawe, David & Hanjra, Munir A. & Hafeez, Mohsin & Asghar, Muhammad Nadeem, 2008. "Evaluating the impact of Tax-for-Fee reform (Fei Gai Shui) on water resources and agriculture production in the Zhanghe Irrigation System, China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 576-586, December.
    3. Grimaldi, Raffaele & Beria, Paolo, 2013. "Open issues in the practice of cost benefit analysis of transport projects," MPRA Paper 53766, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Byrnes, Liam & Brown, Colin & Wagner, Liam & Foster, John, 2016. "Reviewing the viability of renewable energy in community electrification: The case of remote Western Australian communities," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 470-481.

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