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The political determinants of central governments' economic policies in India: an empirical investigation

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  • Kausik Chaudhuri

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India)

  • Sugato Dasgupta

    (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India)

Abstract

Using annual data from India, we investigate whether central governments' economic policies are affected by two political considerations-the proximity of an election to the national legislative assembly, and the nature of the central government (single-party versus coalition). We find that economic policies are responsive to election timing. On the other hand, economic policies are largely insensitive to government type. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Kausik Chaudhuri & Sugato Dasgupta, 2005. "The political determinants of central governments' economic policies in India: an empirical investigation," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(7), pages 957-978.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:17:y:2005:i:7:p:957-978
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1197
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    2. Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya, 2008. "Do Elections Slow Down Economic Globalization Process In India? It’S Politics Stupid !," MPRA Paper 10139, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Eric Dubois, 2016. "Political Business Cycles 40 Years after Nordhaus," Post-Print hal-01291401, HAL.
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    6. Eric Dubois, 2016. "Political Business Cycles 40 Years after Nordhaus," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01291401, HAL.
    7. Bougharriou, Nouha & Benayed, Walid & Gabsi, Foued Badr, 2018. "How does democracy affect public debt? Evidence from the Arab world," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-54, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

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