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Convergence of per capita incomes and agricultural productivity in Africa


  • Angela Lusigi

    (Department of Agricultural and Food Economics, University of Reading, UK)

  • Jenifer Piesse

    (Department of Management, Birkbeck College, University of London, UK)

  • Colin Thirtle

    (Department of Agricultural and Food Economics, University of Reading, UK)


This study is an investigation of convergence in per capita incomes and total factor productivity (TFP) for agriculture in the African continent. The concept of convergence, which is a basic prediction of the neoclassical growth model, has been shown to have considerable explanatory power. Here, the hypotheses of absolute and conditional convergence are tested for incomes and agricultural TFP using a panel of data for 32 African countries. Two methods of testing for convergence are applied. Both show that for this sample, conditional &bgr; convergence holds for the two growth measures and that education and investment appear to be the most important conditioning variables. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Angela Lusigi & Jenifer Piesse & Colin Thirtle, 1998. "Convergence of per capita incomes and agricultural productivity in Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 105-115.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:10:y:1998:i:1:p:105-115 DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1328(199801)10:1<105::AID-JID503>3.0.CO;2-T

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Savvides, Andreas, 1995. "Economic growth in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 449-458, March.
    2. Quah, Danny, 1997. "Empirics for Growth and Distribution: Stratification, Polarization, and Convergence Clubs," CEPR Discussion Papers 1586, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Glaeser, Edward L & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1126-1152, December.
      • Edward L. Glaeser & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1991. "Growth in Cities," NBER Working Papers 3787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    4. Romer,Paul M, 1989. "What determines the rate of growth and technological change?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 279, The World Bank.
    5. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kutub Uddin & Zohurul Anis & Muhammad Jakir Hossain & Zohurul Islam Shamol, 2016. "Examining Convergence in Per Capita Agricultural Production across Selected Asian countries," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 6(10), pages 178-194, October.
    2. Juan Carlos Odar Zagaceta, 2002. "Convergencia y polarización. El caso Peruano: 1961 - 1996," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 29(1 Year 20), pages 47-70, June.
    3. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Comparative Economics of Catch-up in Output per Worker, Total Factor Productivity and Technological Gain in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 215-228, June.
    4. Lusigi, Angela & McDonald, Scott & Roberts, Jennifer R. & Thirtle, Colin G., 2000. "Is African agriculture converging? Evidence from a panel of crop yields," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 39(1), March.
    5. Thirtle, Colin & Piesse, Jenifer & Lusigi, Angela & Suhariyanto, Kecuk, 2003. "Multi-factor agricultural productivity, efficiency and convergence in Botswana, 1981-1996," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 605-624, August.
    6. Magalhaes, Eduardo & Diao, Xinshen, 2009. "Productivity convergence in Brazil: The case of grain production," IFPRI discussion papers 857, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Kecuk Suhariyanto & Colin Thirtle, 2001. "Asian Agricultural Productivity and Convergence," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 96-110.
    8. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2005. "Regional convergence, inequality, and space," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 155-176, April.
    9. Sousa, Cândido T. & Pereira, Elisabeth T., 2012. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Convergence: the Case of the European State Members," MPRA Paper 62017, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Murthy, N. R. Vasudeva & Ukpolo, Victor, 1999. "A test of the conditional convergence hypothesis: econometric evidence from African countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 249-253, November.
    11. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2003. "Convergence and space," Urban/Regional 0311002, EconWPA, revised 16 Nov 2003.

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