IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Asymmetric price transmission in the greek agri-food sector: some tests

  • Ioanna Reziti

    (Centre of Planning and Economic Research, Amerikis 11, 10672, Athens, Greece)

  • Yannis Panagopoulos

    (Centre of Planning and Economic Research, Amerikis 11, 10672, Athens, Greece)

This article employs a general-to-specific approach to analyze the price transmission mechanism between producers and consumers in the Greek agri-food sector. More specifically, the markets examined are vegetables, fruits and the whole food. Using cointegration techniques, two alternative dynamic models are estimated: an error correction model (ECM) and a LSE-Hendry general-to-specific model (GETS). The results indicate the existence of a long-run Granger-causality relationship running from producers to consumers in the vegetables market, while the opposite applies for food and fruits. In addition, asymmetric price transmission appears to apply for food and vegetables, but not for the fruit case. Both models agree upon the asymmetric nature of food and the symmetric nature of fruits but disagree for the case of vegetables. [JEL Classification: Q110, Q130] © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Agribusiness.

Volume (Year): 24 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 16-30

in new window

Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:24:y:2008:i:1:p:16-30
Contact details of provider: Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan, 1998. "Estimating Asymmetric Price Transmission with the Error Correction Representation: An application to the German Pork Market," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 1-18.
  2. Jochen Meyer & Stephan Cramon-Taubadel, 2004. "Asymmetric Price Transmission: A Survey," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 581-611.
  3. Sam Peltzman, 1998. "Prices Rise Faster Than They Fall," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 142, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  4. Habtu Tadesse Weldegebriel, 2004. "Imperfect Price Transmission: Is Market Power Really to Blame?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 101-114.
  5. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G, 1981. "Several Tests for Model Specification in the Presence of Alternative Hypotheses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 781-93, May.
  6. Balke, Nathan S & Fomby, Thomas B, 1997. "Threshold Cointegration," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(3), pages 627-45, August.
  7. S McCorriston & CW Morgan & AJ Rayner, 2001. "Price transmission: the interaction between market power and returns to scale," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 143-159, June.
  8. Lance J. Bachmeier & James M. Griffin, 2003. "New Evidence on Asymmetric Gasoline Price Responses," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 772-776, August.
  9. Richard Tiffin & P. J. Dawson, 2000. "Structural breaks, cointegration and the farm-retail price spread for lamb," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(10), pages 1281-1286.
  10. B. Bhaskara Rao & Gyaneshwar Rao, 2008. "Are US gasoline price adjustments asymmetric?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(6), pages 443-447.
  11. Lutkepohl, Helmut & Reimers, Hans-Eggert, 1992. "Granger-causality in cointegrated VAR processes The case of the term structure," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 263-268, November.
  12. Johansen, Soren, 1992. "Testing weak exogeneity and the order of cointegration in UK money demand data," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 313-334, June.
  13. Theodosios B. Palaskas, 1995. "Statistical Analysis Of Price Transmission In The European Union," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 61-69.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:24:y:2008:i:1:p:16-30. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing)

or (Christopher F. Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.