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Insecure Land Rights and Share Tenancy: Evidence from Madagascar

  • Marc F. Bellemare

Most studies of tenurial insecurity focus on its effects on investment. This paper studies the hitherto unexplored relationship between tenurial insecurity and land tenancy contracts. Based on distinct features of formal law and customary rights in Madagascar, this paper augments the canonical model of sharecropping by making the strength of the landlord’s property right increasing in the amount of risk she bears within the contract. Using data on landlords’ subjective perceptions in rural Madagascar, empirical tests support the hypothesis that insecure property rights drive contract choice but offer little support in favor of the canonical risk sharing hypothesis.

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File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/88/1/155
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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 88 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 155-180

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:88:y:2012:i:1:p:155-180
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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  1. Ellickson, Robert C, 1989. "A Hypothesis of Wealth-Maximizing Norms: Evidence from the Whaling Industry," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 83-97, Spring.
  2. Pierre Dubois, 1999. "Moral Hazard, Land Fertility and Sharecropping in a Rural Area of the Philippines," Working Papers 99-30, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  3. Marc F. Bellemare, 2009. "Sharecropping, Insecure Land Rights and Land Titling Policies: A Case Study of Lac Alaotra, Madagascar," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 27(1), pages 87-106, 01.
  4. Luseno, Winnie K. & McPeak, John G. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Little, Peter D. & Gebru, Getachew, 2003. "Assessing the Value of Climate Forecast Information for Pastoralists: Evidence from Southern Ethiopia and Northern Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(9), pages 1477-1494, September.
  5. Deininger, Klaus & Songqing Jin, 2002. "The impact of property rights on households'investment, risk coping, and policy preferences : evidence from China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2931, The World Bank.
  6. Brasselle, Anne-Sophie & Gaspart, Frederic & Platteau, Jean-Philippe, 2002. "Land tenure security and investment incentives: puzzling evidence from Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 373-418, April.
  7. Besley, Timothy, 1995. "Property Rights and Investment Incentives: Theory and Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 903-37, October.
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