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Long-Term Effects of School Quality on Health and Lifestyle: Evidence from Comprehensive Schooling Reforms in England

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  • Andrew M. Jones
  • Nigel Rice
  • Pedro Rosa Dias

Abstract

Members of the National Child Development Study cohort attended very different types of secondary schools, as their schooling lay within the transition period of the comprehensive education reform in England and Wales. This provides a natural setting to explore the impact of educational attainment and of school quality on health and health-related behavior later in life. We use a combination of matching methods and parametric regressions to deal with selection effects and to evaluate differences in adult health outcomes and health-related behavior for cohort members exposed to the old selective and to the new comprehensive educational systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Pedro Rosa Dias, 2011. "Long-Term Effects of School Quality on Health and Lifestyle: Evidence from Comprehensive Schooling Reforms in England," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(3), pages 342-376.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:doi:10.1086/662441
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. David Jesson, "undated". "The Comparative Evaluation of GCSE Value-Added Performance by Type of School and LEA," Discussion Papers 00/52, Department of Economics, University of York.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jason Fletcher & David Frisvold, 2014. "The long run health returns to college quality," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 295-325, June.
    2. Apouey, Bénédicte H. & Geoffard, Pierre-Yves, 2016. "Parents’ education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 70-89.
    3. Schurer, Stefanie & Kassenboehmer, Sonja C. & Leung, Felix, 2015. "Do Universities Shape Their Students' Personality?," IZA Discussion Papers 8873, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Bijwaard, Govert & Jones, Andrew M., 2016. "Cognitive Ability and the Mortality Gradient by Education: Selection or Mediation?," IZA Discussion Papers 9798, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Marine de Talancé, 2015. "Better Teachers, Better Results? Evidence from Rural Pakistan," Working Papers DT/2015/21, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    6. Conti, Gabriella & Heckman, James J., 2012. "The Economics of Child Well-Being," IZA Discussion Papers 6930, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Conti, Gabriella & Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia & Heckman, James J. & Piatek, Rémi, 2014. "Bayesian exploratory factor analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 183(1), pages 31-57.
    8. Bénédicte H. Apouey & Pierre-Yves Geoffard, 2015. "Parents' education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years," Working Papers halshs-01223321, HAL.
    9. Conti, Gabriella & Hansman, Christopher, 2013. "Personality and the education–health gradient: A note on “Understanding differences in health behaviors by education”," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 480-485.
    10. Schurer, Stefanie & Alspach, Michael & MacRae, Jayden & Martin, Greg L., 2015. "The Medical Care Costs of Mood Disorders: A Coarsened Exact Matching Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 8814, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Bijwaard, G.E. & Jones, A.M., 2015. "Intelligence and the Mortality Difference by Education: Selection or mediation?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/07, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    12. Stefanie Schurer & Michael Alspach & Jayden MacRae & Gregory Martin, 2016. "The Medical Care Costs of Mood Disorders: A Coarsened Exact Matching Approach," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(296), pages 81-93, March.
    13. Apouey, Bénédicte H. & Geoffard, Pierre-Yves, 2016. "Parents’ education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 70-89.

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