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Carbon Tariffs Revisited

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  • Christoph Böhringer
  • André Müller
  • Jan Schneider

Abstract

Concerns about adverse impacts on domestic energy-intensive and trade-exposed (EITE) industries are at the fore of the political debate about unilateral climate policies. Tariffs on the carbon embodied in imported goods from countries without emission pricing appeal as a measure to reduce carbon leakage and protect domestic EITE industries. We show that the introduction of carbon tariffs can do more harm than good to domestic EITE industries. Two determinants drive the sign and magnitude of EITE impacts. First, the composition of embodied emissions in intermediate inputs to EITE production: if a large share of embodied carbon is imported in intermediate inputs, industries might suffer from cost increases due to carbon tariffs. Second, the share of domestic output that is supplied to the export market: while carbon tariffs level the playing field on domestic markets, they increase the cost disadvantage vis-à-vis competitors from abroad in foreign markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Christoph Böhringer & André Müller & Jan Schneider, 2015. "Carbon Tariffs Revisited," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(4), pages 629-672.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jaerec:doi:10.1086/683607
    DOI: 10.1086/683607
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oliver Schenker & Simon Koesler & Andreas Löschel, 2018. "On the effects of unilateral environmental policy on offshoring in multi-stage production processes," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 51(4), pages 1221-1256, November.
    2. Böhringer, Christoph & Rosendahl, Knut Einar & Briseid Storrøsten, Halvor, 2015. "Smart hedging against carbon leakage," Working Paper Series 14-2015, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business.
    3. Zhang, Zengkai & Zhang, Zhongxiang, 2017. "Intermediate input linkage and carbon leakage," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(6), pages 725-746, December.
    4. Al Khourdajie, Alaa & Finus, Michael, 2020. "Measures to enhance the effectiveness of international climate agreements: The case of border carbon adjustments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 124(C).
    5. Christoph Böhringer, Xaquin Garcia-Muros, and Mikel González-Eguino, 2019. "Greener and Fairer: A Progressive Environmental Tax Reform for Spain," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    6. Noha Elboghdadly & Michael Finus, 2020. "Enforcing Climate Agreements: The Role of Escalating Border Carbon Adjustments," Graz Economics Papers 2020-11, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    7. Christoph Boehringer & Knut Einar Rosendahl, 2020. "Europe beyond Coal - An Economic and Climate Impact Assessment," Working Papers V-430-20, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2020.
    8. Soham Baksi & Amrita Ray Chaudhuri, 2016. "International Trade and Environmental Cooperation among Heterogeneous Countries," Departmental Working Papers 2016-03, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.
    9. Larch, Mario & Wanner, Joschka, 2017. "Carbon tariffs: An analysis of the trade, welfare, and emission effects," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 195-213.
    10. Christoph Boehringer & Carolyn Fischer, 2020. "Kill Bill or Tax: An Analysis of Alternative CO2 Price Floor Optionsfor EU Member States," Working Papers V-432-20, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2020.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models

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