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Kangaroos, Cities And Space: A First Approach To The Australian Urban System

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel ARRIBAS-BEL

    () (GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University (USA))

  • Fernando SANZ GRACIA

    () (Department of Economic Analysis, Universidad de Zaragoza (SPAIN))

  • Domingo P. XIMENEZ-DE-EMBUN

    () (Department of Economic Analysis, Universidad de Zaragoza (SPAIN))

Abstract

Australia shapes a unique urban system. This paper examines the Australian urban system using data for urban centers and localities in 1996 and 2001. A summary and a basic descriptive analysis of the database are provided, followed by an examination of whether the system follows Zipf’s and Gibrat’s laws. None of them are found to hold. An Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA) as well as a confirmatory analysis are carried out by using some of the most recent developments in spatial econometrics (Heteroskedastic Consistent GM Estimation) to analyze the spatial dimension of city size and growth, finding no influence for the former but a significant one for the latter.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel ARRIBAS-BEL & Fernando SANZ GRACIA & Domingo P. XIMENEZ-DE-EMBUN, 2012. "Kangaroos, Cities And Space: A First Approach To The Australian Urban System," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 36, pages 165-187.
  • Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:36:y:2012:p:165-187
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    AUSTRALIAN URBAN SYSTEM; ZIPF’S LAW; GIBRAT’S LAW; ESDA (EXPLORATORY SPATIAL DATA ANALYSIS); SPATIAL GIBRAT.;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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