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Evolution of the Spanish Urban Structure During the Twentieth Century

  • Luis Lanaspa

    (Departament of Economic Analysis, University of Zaragoza)

  • Fernando Pueyo

    (Departament of Economic Analysis, University of Zaragoza)

  • Fernando Sanz

    (Departament of Economic Analysis, University of Zaragoza)

In this paper we analyse the evolution of the Spanish urban structure during the period 1900-1999. The methodology employed allows us to obtain two main results. First, that this evolution has not been homogenous, with a divergent pattern of growht being identified for the period running from 1900 to 1970, and a convergent one for the period from 1970 to 1999. Secondly, that the intradistribution movements in the Spanish urban hierarchy were very significant during the course of the 20th century. Apart from these two results, we have also detected the existence of spatial correlation for those cities that have either lost or acquired population during the period in question.

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Paper provided by Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza in its series Documentos de Trabajo with number dt2002-01.

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Date of creation: Jan 2002
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Handle: RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2002-01
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Web page: http://www.dteconz.unizar.es/

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  1. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Empirical cross-section dynamics in economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 426-434, April.
  2. Henry G. Overman & Yannis Menelaos Ioannides, 2001. "Cross-sectional evolution of the U.S. city size distribution," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 584, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Jonathan Eaton & Zvi Eckstein, 1994. "Cities and Growth: Theory and Evidence from france and Japan," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 36, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  4. Rosen, Kenneth T. & Resnick, Mitchel, 1980. "The size distribution of cities: An examination of the Pareto law and primacy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 165-186, September.
  5. Urzua, Carlos M., 2000. "A simple and efficient test for Zipf's law," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 257-260, March.
  6. Xavier Gabaix, 1999. "Zipf'S Law For Cities: An Explanation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 739-767, August.
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