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Labour Market Institutions and Labour Market Performance in Transition Countries

  • Horst Feldmann

This article examines five types of labour market institutions: statutory minimum wages, working-time regulations, hiring and firing regulations, trade unions and industrial relations. It uses the results of surveys that were carried our between 1996 and 2001 among senior business executives from 12 transition countries. In these surveys the managers characterised the institutions of their respective countries. The article conducts multivariate regressions incorporating the survey results and finds that high statutory minimum wages, strict working-time regulations, tight hiring and firing regulations, powerful unions as well as confrontational industrial relations lead to higher unemployment and lower employment, mainly among the problem groups of the labour market: the low-skilled, the long-term unemployed, young people and women.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Post-Communist Economies.

Volume (Year): 17 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 47-82

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Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:17:y:2005:i:1:p:47-82
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  1. Paul Geroski & Paul Gregg & John van Reenen, 1995. "Market Imperfections and Employment," OECD Jobs Study Working Papers 5, OECD Publishing.
  2. James J. Heckman & Carmen Pages, 2000. "The Cost of Job Security Regulation: Evidence from Latin American Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 7773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  4. Richard Layard & Stephen Nickell, 1998. "Labour Market Institutions and Economic Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0407, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. David Neumark & William Wascher, 1992. "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages: Panel Data on State Minimum Wage Laws," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 55-81, October.
  6. Toke Aidt & Zafiris Tzannatos, 2002. "Unions and Collective Bargaining : Economic Effects in a Global Environment," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15241.
  7. Burkhauser, Richard V & Couch, Kenneth A & Wittenburg, David C, 2000. "A Reassessment of the New Economics of the Minimum Wage Literature with Monthly Data from the Current Population Survey," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(4), pages 653-80, October.
  8. Tito Boeri & Katherine Terrell, 2001. "Institutional Determinants of Labor Reallocation in Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 384, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  9. Juan Dolado & Francis Kramarz & Steven Machin & Alan Manning & David Margolis & Coen Teulings, 1996. "The Economic Impact of Minimum Wages in Europe," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00353896, HAL.
  10. Bazen, Stephen & Skourias, Nicolas, 1997. "Is there a negative effect of minimum wages on youth employment in France?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 723-732, April.
  11. Horst Feldmann, 2004. "How Flexible are Labour Markets in the EU Accession Countries Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic?," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 46(2), pages 272-310, June.
  12. Horst Feldmann, 2003. "Labor Market Regulation and Labor Market Performance: Evidence Based on Surveys among Senior Business Executives," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(4), pages 509-540, November.
  13. Carmen Pagés-Serra, 2000. "The Cost of Job Security Regulation: Evidence from Latin American Labor Markets," ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION.
  14. Janet Currie & Bruce Fallick, 1993. "The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Youth: Evidence from the NLSY," NBER Working Papers 4348, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. David G. Blanchflower & Richard B. Freeman, 2000. "Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number blan00-1.
  16. Zavodny, Madeline, 2000. "The effect of the minimum wage on employment and hours," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(6), pages 729-750, November.
  17. Bertola, Giuseppe, 1990. "Job security, employment and wages," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 851-879, June.
  18. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & Thomas Lemieux & David N. Margolis, 1997. "Minimum Wages and Youth Employment in France and the United States," NBER Working Papers 6111, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Bertola, Giuseppe & Rogerson, Richard, 1996. "Institutions and Labour Reallocation," CEPR Discussion Papers 1519, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  20. World Bank, 2001. "Poland's Labor Market : The Challenge of Job Creation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13982.
  21. David Neumark & William Wascher, 1995. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on Teenage Employment and Enrollment: Evidence from Matched CPS Surveys," NBER Working Papers 5092, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  22. International Monetary Fund, 2001. "Labor Markets in Hard-Peg Accession Countries: The Baltics and Bulgaria," IMF Staff Country Reports 01/100, International Monetary Fund.
  23. Richard V. Burkhauser & Kenneth A. Couch & David C. Wittenburg, 2000. "Who Minimum Wage Increases Bite: An Analysis Using Monthly Data from the SIPP and the CPS," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(1), pages 16-40, July.
  24. Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 1992. "Minimum Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp0080, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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