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Poverty, taxation and governance

Author

Listed:
  • Sugata Marjit
  • Vivekananda Mukherjee
  • Martin Kolmar

Abstract

In a simple model based on political support approach, we show that poor and less egalitarian societies may impose a lower tax rate contrary to the prediction of the median voter approach. This is consistent with the available empirical findings. In the framework developed in this paper, the government can strategically design a weak governance system to promote informal activities for the poor. This constitutes an alternative redistributive strategy other than the standard tax-transfer policy. The government chooses the tax rate and the degree of governance simultaneously to maximize the average income of the poor in the informal sector of the economy, i.e. those who constitute the majority and help in winning the election.

Suggested Citation

  • Sugata Marjit & Vivekananda Mukherjee & Martin Kolmar, 2006. "Poverty, taxation and governance," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 325-333.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:15:y:2006:i:3:p:325-333
    DOI: 10.1080/09638190600871636
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marjit, Sugata, 2003. "Economic reform and informal wage--a general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 371-378, October.
    2. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 1999. "Political economics and macroeconomic policy," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 22, pages 1397-1482 Elsevier.
    3. Marcouiller, Douglas & Young, Leslie, 1995. "The Black Hole of Graft: The Predatory State and the Informal Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 630-646, June.
    4. Paul, Gilles Saint & Verdier, Thierry, 1996. "Inequality, redistribution and growth: A challenge to the conventional political economy approach," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 719-728, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Broll, Udo & Kemnitz, Alexander & Mukherjee, Vivekananda, 2009. "Globalization and a welfare program for the marginalized," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 05/09, Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
    2. Sugata Marjit & Saibal Kar, 2012. "Firm Heterogeneity, Informal Wage and Good Governance," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(4), pages 527-539, November.
    3. Sugata Marjit & Biswajit Mandal, 2016. "International Trade, Migration and Unemployment – The Role of Informal Sector," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 8-22, March.
    4. Tony Addison & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa & Jukka Pirttilä, 2018. "Fiscal policy, state building and economic development," WIDER Working Paper Series 005, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Marroquín Arreola, Juan & Rios Bolívar, Humberto, 2012. "Gasto público, permanencia en el poder y crecimiento económico /Public Spending, Staying Power and Economic Growth," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 363(22)-363, Abril.
    6. Dutta, Nabamita & Kar, Saibal & Roy, Sanjukta, 2013. "Corruption and persistent informality: An empirical investigation for India," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 357-373.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taxation; inequality; governance; poverty;

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