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How Access to Credit Affects Self-employment: Differences by Gender during India's Rural Banking Reform

  • Nidhiya Menon
  • Yana van der Meulen Rodgers

Household survey data for 1983-2000 from India's National Sample Survey Organisation are used to examine the impact of credit on self-employment among men and women in rural labour households. Results indicate that credit access encourages women's self-employment as own-account workers and employers, while it discourages men's self-employment as unpaid family workers. Ownership of land, a key form of collateral, also serves as a strong predictor of self-employment. Among the lower castes in India, self-employment is less likely for scheduled castes prone to wage activity, but more likely for scheduled tribes prone to entrepreneurial work.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

Volume (Year): 47 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 48-69

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:47:y:2011:i:1:p:48-69
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