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Can Commercially-oriented Microfinance Help Meet the Millennium Development Goals? Evidence from Pakistan

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  • Montgomery, Heather
  • Weiss, John

Abstract

Summary The current emphasis in the microfinance industry is a shift from donor-funded to commercially sustainable operations. This article evaluates the impact of access to microloans from the Khushhali Bank--Pakistan's first and largest microfinance bank which operates on commercial principles. Using primary data from a detailed household survey of nearly 3,000 borrower and non-borrower households, a difference in difference approach is used to test for the impact of access to loans. Once the results are disaggregated between rural and urban areas there is a positive impact in rural areas on food expenditure and on some social indicators such as the health of children and female empowerment. These impacts are observed even in very poor households. These findings suggest that commercially-oriented microfinance and the millennium development goals are not incompatible, given a supportive environment.

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  • Montgomery, Heather & Weiss, John, 2011. "Can Commercially-oriented Microfinance Help Meet the Millennium Development Goals? Evidence from Pakistan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 87-109, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:1:p:87-109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Swamy, Vighneswara, 2014. "Financial Inclusion, Gender Dimension, and Economic Impact on Poor Households," World Development, Elsevier, pages 1-15.
    2. Janda, Karel & Van Tran, Quang & Zetek, Pavel, 2014. "Influence of External Funding on Microfinance Performance," MPRA Paper 58170, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Janda, Karel & Tran, Quang & Zetek, Pavel, 2014. "Vliv externího financování na mikrofinanční rozvoj - makro perspektiva
      [Influence of external funding on microfinance performance - macro perspective]
      ," MPRA Paper 58166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Akotey, Joseph Oscar & Adjasi, Charles K.D., 2016. "Does Microcredit Increase Household Welfare in the Absence of Microinsurance?," World Development, Elsevier, pages 380-394.
    5. Janda, Karel & Zetek, Pavel, 2014. "The Impact of Public Spending on the Performance of Microfinance Institutions," MPRA Paper 55690, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Weber, Olaf & Ahmad, Adnan, 2014. "Empowerment Through Microfinance: The Relation Between Loan Cycle and Level of Empowerment," World Development, Elsevier, pages 75-87.
    7. Dan Brockington & Nicola Banks, 2014. "Exploring the Success of BRAC Tanzania’s Microcredit Programme," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 20214, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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