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Second-Generation Immigrants in the Swedish Labour Market

Author

Listed:
  • Lars Behrenz
  • Mats Hammarstedt
  • Jonas Månsson

Abstract

This study focuses on the labour market performance among second-generation immigrants in Sweden. One motivation behind the analysis is that it gives insight into the long-term consequences of immigration. Labour market performance relates the probability of having a job, referred to here as a threshold effect and to the differences in income from work, given that a person is in the market and is referred to as an income from work effect. We have shown that a clear threshold effect of being a second-generation immigrant exists and that different groups of second-generation immigrants perform differently in the Swedish labour market.

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Behrenz & Mats Hammarstedt & Jonas Månsson, 2007. "Second-Generation Immigrants in the Swedish Labour Market," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 157-174.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:21:y:2007:i:1:p:157-174
    DOI: 10.1080/02692170601035074
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Solon, Gary, 1999. "Intergenerational mobility in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 29, pages 1761-1800 Elsevier.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Efendic, Nedim & Andersson, Fredrik W. & Wennberg, Karl, 2015. "Growth in first- and second-generation immigrant firms in Sweden," Ratio Working Papers 265, The Ratio Institute.
    2. J. Ekberg & M. Hammarstedt & G. Shukur, 2010. "Immigrant-native earnings differentials: SUR estimation applied on three generations," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 45(3), pages 705-720, December.
    3. Ekberg, Jan & Hammarstedt, Mats & Shukur, Ghazi, 2007. "SUR estimation of earnings differentials between three generations of immigrants and natives," CAFO Working Papers 2007:7, Linnaeus University, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics.
    4. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Lene Kromann, 2014. "Differences in the labor market entry of second-generation immigrants and ethnic Danes," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-22, December.
    5. Hammarstedt, Mats, 2007. "Intergenerational mobility among three generations of immigrants in Sweden," CAFO Working Papers 2007:4, Linnaeus University, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics.
    6. Katz, Katarina & Österberg, Torun, 2013. "Wages of childhood immigrants in Sweden – education, returns to education and overeducation," Working Paper Series 2013:8, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

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