IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/ijecbs/v11y2004i3p369-378.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Is monopsony the right way to model labor markets? a review of Alan Manning's monopsony in motion

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Kuhn

Abstract

Manning proposes that the 'traditional' monopsony model, once regarded as an analytical curiosity, be adopted as a widely-applicable description of firms' behavior in labor markets. In Manning's view, search frictions in the labor market generate upward-sloping labor supply curves to individual firms even when firms are small relative to the labor market. Thus a model of 'monopsonistic competition' best characterizes labor markets as a whole. Manning's book applies this new perspective to a wide range of 'traditional' topics in labor economics, ranging from labor supply, to gender discrimination, to the effects of trade unions on wages and employment, generating refreshing new insights in each case. Ultimately, however, this reader was left unconvinced that monopsony is the 'right' model of most firms' labor market behavior in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Kuhn, 2004. "Is monopsony the right way to model labor markets? a review of Alan Manning's monopsony in motion," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 369-378.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ijecbs:v:11:y:2004:i:3:p:369-378
    DOI: 10.1080/1357151042000286456
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1357151042000286456
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Devine, Theresa J. & Kiefer, Nicolas M., 1991. "Empirical Labor Economics: The Search Approach," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195059366.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Michael R Ransom & David P. Sims, 2010. "Estimating the Firm's Labor Supply Curve in a "New Monopsony" Framework: Schoolteachers in Missouri," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 331-355, April.
    2. Michael R Ransom & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2010. "New Market Power Models and Sex Differences in Pay," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 267-289, April.
    3. Arindrajit Dube & Jeff Jacobs & Suresh Naidu & Siddharth Suri, 2018. "Monopsony in Online Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 24416, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Michael R. Ransom & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2008. "New Market Power Models and Sex Differences in Pay," Working Papers 1110, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    5. Katalin Bodnár & Ludmila Fadejeva & Stefania Iordache & Liina Malk & Desislava Paskaleva & Jurga Pesliakaite & Nataša Todorovic Jemec & Peter Tóth & Robert Wyszynski, 2017. "How do firms adjust to rises in the minimum wage? Survey evidence from Central and Eastern Europe," Working and Discussion Papers WP 9/2017, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
    6. Xavier Méra, 2017. "Monopsony Theory Revisited," Post-Print halshs-01519191, HAL.
    7. Michael R. Ransom & David P. Sims, 2008. "Estimating the Firm's Labor Supply Curve in a "New Monopsony" Framework: School Teachers in Missouri," Working Papers 1108, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monopsony; Search; Labor Markets; Wages; Employment; JEL Classification: J00; J42; J63;

    JEL classification:

    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ijecbs:v:11:y:2004:i:3:p:369-378. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CIJB20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.