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Higher Education and the Determination of Aggregate Male Employment by Age

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  • Anders Stenberg
  • Magnus Wikstrom

Abstract

This paper studies the determinants of age-specific employment rates among Swedish males, focusing on the effect of education on employment. We use cohort specific data for the time period 1984-1996 covering male cohorts aged 21-45. It is found that aggregate age-group-specific employment rates increase with the proportion of the cohort with an academic degree. Two states of the labour market are then compared; the high employment period 1984-1990 and the downturn 1991-1996. The effect is stronger in the downturn period as compared with the boom period. However, we do not find any strong evidence in favour of the hypothesis that the effect of higher education on employment is declining with age. A measure of relative education is used to capture crowding out effects. The results indicate a significant effect in the high employment period.

Suggested Citation

  • Anders Stenberg & Magnus Wikstrom, 2004. "Higher Education and the Determination of Aggregate Male Employment by Age," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 87-101.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:12:y:2004:i:1:p:87-101
    DOI: 10.1080/0964529042000193961
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Saint-Paul, Gilles, 1996. "Are the unemployed unemployable?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 1501-1519, August.
    2. Teulings, Coen & Koopmanschap, Marc, 1989. "An econometric model of crowding out of lower education levels," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1653-1664, October.
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    6. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    7. Nickell, Stephen, 1979. "Education and Lifetime Patterns of Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 117-131, October.
    8. Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1991. "Ageing and the Labor Market: Age Structure, Cohort Size and Unemployment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 4(3), pages 177-200, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brox, James A. & Carvalho, Emanuel, 2008. "A Demographically Augmented Shift-Share Employment Analysis: An Application to Canadian Employment Patterns," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 38(1).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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