IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v33y2001i3p309-315.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Human capital, reservation wages and job competition: Heckman's lambda re-interpreted

Author

Listed:
  • Ides Nicaise

Abstract

This study integrates insights from three theories into a single model explaining the simultaneous distribution of employment and wages. Human capital theory is taken as the general framework, whereas search theory and the more recent 'crowding' or 'job competition' hypothesis are used to explain selectivity in employment and the resulting bias in wage regressions. An empirical test on Belgian data, using a two-stage probit-OLS model, indicates that the crowding theory dominates the search hypothesis for men. For women, it seems to be outweighed by relatively higher reservation wages, probably due to women's different behaviour with respect to family responsibilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Ides Nicaise, 2001. "Human capital, reservation wages and job competition: Heckman's lambda re-interpreted," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3), pages 309-315.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:3:p:309-315
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840121810
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840121810
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Teulings, Coen & Koopmanschap, Marc, 1989. "An econometric model of crowding out of lower education levels," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1653-1664, October.
    2. van Ours, J. C. & Ridder, G., 1995. "Job matching and job competition: Are lower educated workers at the back of job queues?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1717-1731, December.
    3. Dolton, P. J. & Makepeace, G. H., 1987. "Interpreting sample selection effects," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 373-379.
    4. Blackburn, McKinley L & Neumark, David, 1995. "Are OLS Estimates of the Return to Schooling Biased Downward? Another Look," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 217-230, May.
    5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2012. "Overeducation at a glance. Determinants and wage effects of the educational mismatch, looking at the AlmaLaurea data," Discussion Papers 18_2012, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    2. Khurshid Alam & Sakiba Tasneem & Molla Huq, 2014. "Reservation wage of female volunteer community health workers in Dhaka urban slums: a bidding game approach," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 1-10, December.
    3. Madhu Mohanty, 2005. "An alternative method of estimating the worker's reservation wage," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 501-522.
    4. repec:spr:epolit:v:35:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s40888-017-0075-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2018. "Overeducation at a Glance. Determinants and Wage Effects of the Educational Mismatch Based on AlmaLaurea Data," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 137(3), pages 999-1032, June.
    6. DeVoretz, Don J. & Pivnenko, Sergiy, 2005. "Self-Selection, Immigrant Public Finance Performance and Canadian Citizenship," IZA Discussion Papers 1463, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Luca Cattani & Giovanni Guidetti & Giulio Pedrini, 2016. "Overeducation among Italian graduates: do different measures actually diverge?," Working Papers 77, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    8. Mahmoud K. El-Jafari, 2010. "Efficiency and Effectiveness of Palestinian Vocational Education and Training," Working Papers 571, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Jan 2010.
    9. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2010. "Assessing the Returns to Education in Georgia," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_608, Levy Economics Institute.
    10. Min Qin & James Brown & Sabu S. Padmadas & Li Bohua & Qi Jianan & Jane Falkingham, 2016. "Gender Inequalities in Employment and Wage-earning among Economic Migrants in Chinese Cities," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(6), pages 175-202, January.
    11. Caroleo, Floro Ernesto & Pastore, Francesco, 2015. "Overeducation: A Disease of the School-to-Work Transition System," IZA Discussion Papers 9049, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. repec:bla:asiaec:v:30:y:2016:i:4:p:375-400 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Pietro Giorgio Lovaglio & Gianmarco Vacca & Stefano Verzillo, 2016. "Human capital estimation in higher education," Advances in Data Analysis and Classification, Springer;German Classification Society - Gesellschaft für Klassifikation (GfKl);Japanese Classification Society (JCS);Classification and Data Analysis Group of the Italian Statistical Society (CLADAG);International Federation of Classification Societies (IFCS), vol. 10(4), pages 465-489, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:3:p:309-315. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.