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Health and productivity in a heterogeneous urban labour market

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  • Peter Glick
  • David E. Sahn

Abstract

The effects of changes in various health indicators on hourly earnings in different sectors of the labour market are examined using survey data from Conakry, Guinea. Greater height, which is associated with greater strength, raises earnings of men both in self-employment and the private wage sector, where work is likely to involve physical labour. Height does not matter for women's earnings, which likely reflects the less physically strenuous nature of most women's activities. Body mass index, treated as an endogenous variable, appears to raise earnings of men in self- and private wage employment and of women in self-employment. No impacts are found for household per capita calorie and protein availability, also treated as endogenous. Overall, the results suggest that health matters for productivity in poor urban environments, with these effects depending on gender and the sector of employment or type of work.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Glick & David E. Sahn, 1998. "Health and productivity in a heterogeneous urban labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 203-216, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:2:p:203-216
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498326001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Payne, Philip & Lipton, Michael, 1994. "How Third World rural households adapt to dietary energy stress," Food policy reviews 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    1. Luiz Fernando Alves & Mônica Viegas Andrade, 2002. "Health status impacts on individual earnings in Brazil," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td173, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
    2. Fabio Sabatini, 2005. "Does Social Capital Improve Labour Productivity in Small and Medium Enterprises?," Others 0509011, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Price, Gregory N., 2013. "The allometry of metabolism and stature: Worker fatigue and height in the Tanzanian labor market," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 515-521.
    4. Erkan Erdil & I. Hakan Yetkiner, 2009. "The Granger-causality between health care expenditure and output: a panel data approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 511-518.
    5. Maria L. Loureiro, 2009. "Farmers' health and agricultural productivity," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(4), pages 381-388, July.
    6. repec:spr:irpnmk:v:14:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12208-017-0175-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Justin van der Sluis & Mirjam van Praag & Wim Vijverberg, 2003. "Entrepreneurship Selection and Performance," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-046/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 24 Sep 2004.
    8. Pierre LEVASSEUR, 2016. "The effects of bodyweight on wages in urban Mexico," Cahiers du GREThA 2016-18, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    9. Cawley, John & Han, Euna & Norton, Edward C., 2009. "Obesity and labor market outcomes among legal immigrants to the United States from developing countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 153-164, July.
    10. Shing-Yi Wang, 2015. "Statistical Discrimination, Productivity, and the Height of Immigrants," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 68(3), pages 529-557, May.
    11. World Bank, 2007. "Healthy Development : The World Bank Strategy for Health, Nutrition, and Population Results," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6843, September.
    12. Levasseur, Pierre, 2017. "The ambiguous causal relationship between body-mass and labour income in emerging economies: The case of Mexico," MPRA Paper 81933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Xie, Ruizhi & Awokuse, Titus O., 2013. "The Role of Health Status on Income in China," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151137, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Fabio Sabatini, 2005. "Does Social Capital Improve Labour Productivity in Small and Medium Enterprises?," Others 0508005, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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