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Globally Happy: Individual Globalization, Expanded Capacities, and Subjective Wellbeing

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  • Ming-Chang Tsai

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  • Heng-Hao Chang
  • Wan-chi Chen

Abstract

Deep integration of Asia into the global society necessarily affects wellbeing of local populations. This study proposes a notion of “extend capacities” to explain the relationships between individual globalization and subjective wellbeing among Asian populations in a context of increasing global integration. Using Amartya Sen’s theory of human capacities as a point of departure, we advance a distinctive list of expanded capacities, which includes English ability, global exposure and foreign contacts via jobs. Empirical findings from our multilevel analysis of a large sample from 14 Asian countries show the consistent impact of mastering a global lingua franca on job satisfaction, perceived life accomplishment, and happiness. Global exposure also generates some favorable influences. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Ming-Chang Tsai & Heng-Hao Chang & Wan-chi Chen, 2012. "Globally Happy: Individual Globalization, Expanded Capacities, and Subjective Wellbeing," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 108(3), pages 509-524, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:108:y:2012:i:3:p:509-524
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-011-9890-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1372-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Chu-Chia Lin & Tsung-Chi Cheng & Shu-Chen Wang, 2014. "Measuring Subjective Well-Being in Taiwan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(1), pages 17-45, March.

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    Keywords

    Happiness; Asia; Globalization; Capacities theory;

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