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Analysis of post-disaster damage and disruptive impacts on the operating status of small businesses after Hurricane Katrina

Author

Listed:
  • Sandra Sydnor

    () (Purdue University)

  • Linda Niehm

    (Iowa State University)

  • Yoon Lee

    (Utah State University)

  • Maria Marshall

    (Purdue University)

  • Holly Schrank

    (Purdue University)

Abstract

Abstract When small businesses are impacted by natural hazard events, hazard and sociological researchers may have access to collect data from a sample of open businesses, in hopes of distilling lessons that might help reduce vulnerability to future disasters. Lessons from demised businesses might be more useful in reducing business closure for increasing business sustainability to disasters. Using interviews from a random sample of 371 open and 126 closed businesses’ experiences with Hurricane Katrina, discrete choice methods examine the relationship between the impact of post-disaster damage, loss of lifelines, types of delays in reopening, and cascading damages on business continuity. This unique sample offers the opportunity to determine whether damage to operating businesses was different than that of demised businesses. Respondents provided pre-Katrina data up through the last interviews in 2013. Results demonstrate that damage may have a short-term effect on operating status; it was associated with immediate demise but had much less effect on longer-term recovery. Additionally, it is evident that there is one path to failure. Businesses that did reopen, but later closed, may have been impacted by a cascade of both exogenous and endogenous shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Sydnor & Linda Niehm & Yoon Lee & Maria Marshall & Holly Schrank, 2017. "Analysis of post-disaster damage and disruptive impacts on the operating status of small businesses after Hurricane Katrina," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 85(3), pages 1637-1663, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:85:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11069-016-2652-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-016-2652-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anita Schiller, 2011. "The impact of a storm surge on business establishments in the Houston MSA," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 56(1), pages 331-346, January.
    2. Holly Schrank & Maria Marshall & Adrienne Hall-Phillips & Renee Wiatt & Nicole Jones, 2013. "Small-business demise and recovery after Katrina: rate of survival and demise," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 65(3), pages 2353-2374, February.
    3. Maria Marshall & Linda Niehm & Sandra Sydnor & Holly Schrank, 2015. "Predicting small business demise after a natural disaster: an analysis of pre-existing conditions," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 79(1), pages 331-354, October.
    4. Emek Basker & Javier Miranda, 2014. "Taken by Storm: Business Financing, Survival, and Contagion in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina," Working Papers 1406, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised 23 Oct 2014.
    5. Stafford, Kathryn & Danes, Sharon M. & Haynes, George W., 2013. "Long-term family firm survival and growth considering owning family adaptive capacity and federal disaster assistance receipt," Journal of Family Business Strategy, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 188-200.
    6. Winter, Mary & Danes, Sharon M. & Koh, Sun-Kang & Fredericks, Kelly & Paul, Jennifer J., 2004. "Tracking family businesses and their owners over time: panel attrition, manager departure and business demise," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 535-559, July.
    7. James S. Ang, 1991. "Small Business Uniqueness and the Theory of Financial Management," Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, Pepperdine University, Graziadio School of Business and Management, vol. 1(1), pages 1-13, Spring.
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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:7:p:2364-:d:156753 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:651-:d:134061 is not listed on IDEAS

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