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Fathers’ time investments in children: do sons get more?


  • Kristin Mammen



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Suggested Citation

  • Kristin Mammen, 2011. "Fathers’ time investments in children: do sons get more?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 839-871, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:24:y:2011:i:3:p:839-871
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-009-0272-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Katharine G. Abraham & Aaron Maitland & Suzanne M. Bianchi, 2006. "Non-response in the American Time Use Survey: Who Is Missing from the Data and How Much Does It Matter?," NBER Technical Working Papers 0328, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Gordon B. Dahl & Enrico Moretti, 2008. "The Demand for Sons," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1085-1120.
    3. Eliana Garces & Duncan Thomas & Janet Currie, 2002. "Longer-Term Effects of Head Start," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 999-1012, September.
    4. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2008. "Preschool Television Viewing and Adolescent Test Scores: Historical Evidence from the Coleman Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(1), pages 279-323.
    5. Nancy Folbre & Jayoung Yoon, 2007. "What is child care? Lessons from time-use surveys of major English-speaking countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 223-248, September.
    6. George B. Roberts, Chairman, Universities-National Bureau Committee for Economic Research, 1960. "Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number univ60-2, January.
    7. Nancy Folbre & Jayoung Yoon & Kade Finnoff & Allison Sidle Fuligni, 2004. "By What Measure? Family Time Devoted to Children in the U.S," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2004-06, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    8. Eric Edmonds, 2006. "Understanding sibling differences in child labor," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 795-821, October.
    9. Robert Kaestner, 1997. "Are Brothers Really Better? Sibling Sex Composition and Educational Achievement Revisited," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 250-284.
    10. Case, Anne & Fertig, Angela & Paxson, Christina, 2005. "The lasting impact of childhood health and circumstance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 365-389, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ronen Bar-El & Teresa García-Muñoz & Shoshana Neuman & Yossef Tobol, 2013. "The evolution of secularization: cultural transmission, religion and fertility—theory, simulations and evidence," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(3), pages 1129-1174, July.
    2. Steffen Müller & Regina T. Riphahn & Caroline Schwientek, 2017. "Paternal unemployment during childhood: causal effects on youth worklessness and educational attainment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 213-238.
    3. Adele Menniti & Pietro Demurtas & Serena Arima & Alessandra De Rose, "undated". "Gender inequality at home when mothers work. The case of Italy," Working Papers 130/14, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.
    4. Alexandre Chiavegatto Filho & Ichiro Kawachi, 2013. "Are sex-selective abortions a characteristic of every poor region? Evidence from Brazil," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(3), pages 395-400, June.
    5. Espen Bratberg & Karsten Elseth Rieck & Kjell Vaage, 2014. "Intergenerational earnings mobility and divorce," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 1107-1126, October.
    6. Kabátek, Jan & Ribar, David C., 2017. "Teenage Daughters as a Cause of Divorce," IZA Discussion Papers 11046, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Tracey, Marlon R. & Polachek, Solomon, 2017. "If Looks Could Heal: Child Health and Paternal Investment," IZA Discussion Papers 10866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0668-6 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Children; Gender; Intrahousehold allocation; D13; J13; J16; J22;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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