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Factors Shaping Workplace Segregation Between Natives and Immigrants


  • Magnus Strömgren


  • Tiit Tammaru


  • Alexander Danzer


  • Maarten Ham


  • Szymon Marcińczak


  • Olof Stjernström


  • Urban Lindgren



Research on segregation of immigrant groups is increasingly turning its attention from residential areas toward other important places, such as the workplace, where immigrants can meet and interact with members of the native population. This article examines workplace segregation of immigrants. We use longitudinal, georeferenced Swedish population register data, which enables us to observe all immigrants in Sweden for the period 1990–2005 on an annual basis. We compare estimates from ordinary least squares with fixed-effects regressions to quantify the extent of immigrants’ self-selection into specific workplaces, neighborhoods, and partnerships, which may bias more naïve ordinary least squares results. In line with previous research, we find lower levels of workplace segregation than residential segregation. The main finding is that low levels of residential segregation reduce workplace segregation, even after we take into account intermarriage with natives as well as unobserved characteristics of immigrants’ such as willingness and ability to integrate into the host society. Being intermarried with a native reduces workplace segregation for immigrant men but not for immigrant women. Copyright Population Association of America 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Magnus Strömgren & Tiit Tammaru & Alexander Danzer & Maarten Ham & Szymon Marcińczak & Olof Stjernström & Urban Lindgren, 2014. "Factors Shaping Workplace Segregation Between Natives and Immigrants," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 645-671, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:51:y:2014:i:2:p:645-671
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-013-0271-8

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Glitz, Albrecht, 2014. "Ethnic segregation in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 28-40.
    2. Tammaru, Tiit & Strömgren, Magnus & van Ham, Maarten & Danzer, Alexander M., 2015. "Gender Differences in the Effect of Residential Segregation on Workplace Segregation among Newly Arrived Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 8932, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Marigee Bacolod & Marcos A. Rangel, 2017. "Economic Assimilation and Skill Acquisition: Evidence From the Occupational Sorting of Childhood Immigrants," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 571-602, April.
    4. Kamenik, Kristiina & Tammaru, Tiit & van Ham, Maarten, 2016. "EthniCity of Leisure: A Domains Approach to Ethnic Integration During Free Time Activities," IZA Discussion Papers 10146, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).


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