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Gender Differences in the Effect of Residential Segregation on Workplace Segregation among Newly Arrived Immigrants

Author

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  • Tammaru, Tiit

    () (University of Tartu)

  • Strömgren, Magnus

    () (Umeå University)

  • van Ham, Maarten

    () (Delft University of Technology)

  • Danzer, Alexander M.

    () (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt)

Abstract

Contemporary cities are becoming more and more diverse in population as a result of immigration. Research also shows that within cities residential neighborhoods are becoming ethnically more diverse, but that residential segregation has remained persistently high. High levels of segregation are often seen as negative, preventing integration of immigrants in their host society and having a negative impact on people's lives. Segregation research often focuses on residential neighborhoods, but ignores the fact that a lot of interaction also takes place in other spheres of life, such as the workplace. This paper examines the role of residential segregation in workplace segregation among recently arrived immigrants. By using unique longitudinal register data from Sweden, we show that the role of residential segregation in workplace segregation differs in an important way for immigrant men and immigrant women.

Suggested Citation

  • Tammaru, Tiit & Strömgren, Magnus & van Ham, Maarten & Danzer, Alexander M., 2015. "Gender Differences in the Effect of Residential Segregation on Workplace Segregation among Newly Arrived Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 8932, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8932
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Judith K. Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2008. "Workplace Segregation in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Skill," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(3), pages 459-477, August.
    2. Judith K. Hellerstein & Melissa McInerney & David Neumark, 2011. "Neighbors and Coworkers: The Importance of Residential Labor Market Networks," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 659-695.
    3. Sako Musterd & Roger Andersson & George Galster & Timo M Kauppinen, 2008. "Are immigrants’ earnings influenced by the characteristics of their neighbours?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 40(4), pages 785-805, April.
    4. Sonia Arbaci, 2007. "Ethnic Segregation, Housing Systems and Welfare Regimes in Europe," International Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(4), pages 401-433.
    5. Magnus Strömgren & Tiit Tammaru & Alexander Danzer & Maarten Ham & Szymon Marcińczak & Olof Stjernström & Urban Lindgren, 2014. "Factors Shaping Workplace Segregation Between Natives and Immigrants," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 645-671, April.
    6. David Wong & Shih-Lung Shaw, 2011. "Measuring segregation: an activity space approach," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 127-145, June.
    7. Maarten van Ham & Pieter Hooimeijer & Clara H. Mulder, 2001. "Urban Form and Job Access: Disparate Realities in the Randstad," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 92(2), pages 231-246, May.
    8. Tiit Tammaru & Magnus Strömgren & Olof Stjernström & Urban Lindgren, 2010. "Learning through contact? The effects on earnings of immigrant exposure to the native population," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 42(12), pages 2938-2955, December.
    9. Damm, Anna Piil, 2014. "Neighborhood quality and labor market outcomes: Evidence from quasi-random neighborhood assignment of immigrants," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 139-166.
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    Cited by:

    1. Öner, Özge & Klaesson, Johan, 2018. "Getting the First Job – Size and Quality of Ethnic Enclaves for Refugee Labor Market Entry," Working Paper Series 1256, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigrants; residential segregation; workplace segregation; longitudinal analysis; Sweden;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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