IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v33y2001i15p1971-1979.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Language training, language proficiency and earnings of immigrants in Norway

Author

Listed:
  • John Hayfron

Abstract

This paper uses a simple probit model to determine the impact of language training on the language proficiency of Third World immigrant men in Norway. It also estimates the labour market returns to Norwegian language proficiency. The results show that immigrants who participate in language training programme are more likely to acquire speaking and reading proficiencies in Norwegian language than those who do not. Contrary to expectation, language proficiency has no significant effect on immigrants' earnings. A probable explanation may be that immigrants need Norwegian language proficiency to get into jobs in the Norwegian labour market. Once they are in employment, their wages are not necessarily determined by their proficiency in Norwegian. Consistent with the assimilation hypothesis, earlier waves of immigrants have higher earnings than do more recent waves, and part of the initial earnings deficit experienced by more recent immigrants can be attributed to language deficiency. There was no evidence of sample selection bias in the earnings equation.

Suggested Citation

  • John Hayfron, 2001. "Language training, language proficiency and earnings of immigrants in Norway," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(15), pages 1971-1979.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:15:p:1971-1979 DOI: 10.1080/00036840010018630
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840010018630
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhuang, Juzhong, 1996. "Estimating Distortions in the Chinese Economy: A General Equilibrium Approach," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(252), pages 543-568, November.
    2. Wang, Zhi, 1997. "The Impact of China and Taiwan Joining the World Trade Organization on U.S. and World Agricultural Trade: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Technical Bulletins 184382, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Dewatripont, Mathias & Michel, Gilles, 1987. "On closure rules, homogeneity and dynamics in applied general equilibrium models," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 65-76.
    4. Abdelhak Senhadji, 1997. "Two common problems related to the use of the Armington aggregator in computable general equilibrium models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 23-25.
    5. Shoven,John B. & Whalley,John, 1992. "Applying General Equilibrium," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521266550, March.
    6. Brown, Drusilla K., 1987. "Tariffs, the terms of trade, and national product differentiation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 503-526.
    7. Bandara, Jayatilleke S, 1991. " Computable General Equilibrium Models for Development Policy Analysis in LDCs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 3-69.
    8. Dirk Willenbockel, 1999. "On apparent problems with the use of the Armington aggregator in computable general equilibrium models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(9), pages 589-591.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David McKenzie & Dean Yang, 2015. "Evidence on Policies to Increase the Development Impacts of International Migration," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 155-192.
    2. Douzounet Mallaye & Koulké Blandine Nan-Guer & Urbain Thierry Yogo & Eurydice Tormal Gosngar, 2015. "Education Language Choice and Youth Entrepreneurship in Chad," Working Papers PMMA 2015-02, PEP-PMMA.
    3. Ingo E. Isphording, 2015. "What drives the language proficiency of immigrants?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 177-177, August.
    4. Berman, Eli & Lang, Kevin & Siniver, Erez, 2003. "Language-skill complementarity: returns to immigrant language acquisition," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 265-290, June.
    5. Aslund, Olof & Engdahl, Mattias, 2012. "The Value of Earning for Learning: Performance Bonuses in Immigrant Language Training," IZA Discussion Papers 7118, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. repec:spr:izamig:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0094-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Gao, Wenshu & Smyth, Russell, 2011. "Economic returns to speaking 'standard Mandarin' among migrants in China's urban labour market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 342-352, April.
    8. Saarela, Jan & Finnas, Fjalar, 2006. "Can the low unemployment rate of Swedish speakers in Finland be attributed to structural factors?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 498-513, June.
    9. Budría, Santiago & Swedberg, Pablo, 2014. "The Impact of Multilingualism on Spanish Language Acquisition among Immigrants in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 8748, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Kathryn H. Anderson, 2015. "Can immigrants ever earn as much as native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 159-159, June.
    11. Magnus Strömgren & Tiit Tammaru & Alexander Danzer & Maarten Ham & Szymon Marcińczak & Olof Stjernström & Urban Lindgren, 2014. "Factors Shaping Workplace Segregation Between Natives and Immigrants," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 645-671, April.
    12. Ulf Rinne, 2013. "The evaluation of immigration policies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 28, pages 530-552 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Jutta Hoehne & Ines Michalowski, 2016. "Long-Term Effects of Language Course Timing on Language Acquisition and Social Contacts: Turkish and Moroccan Immigrants in Western Europe," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 133-162, March.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:15:p:1971-1979. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.