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The residency decision of elderly indonesians: A nested logit analysis


  • Lisa Cameron



This paper is the first study of which the author is aware that examines the residency decision of elderly Indonesians. It also makes a methodological contribution to the literature. The Indonesian Family Life Survey provides detailed data on the living children of a sample of elderly individuals. This allows a nested logit to be estimated which pays due respect to the role of children's characteristics in determining the residency outcome and incorporates the estimated earnings potential of the parents and their children as explanatory variables.
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  • Lisa Cameron, 2000. "The residency decision of elderly indonesians: A nested logit analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(1), pages 17-27, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:37:y:2000:i:1:p:17-27
    DOI: 10.2307/2648093

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hensher, David A, 1986. "Sequential and Full Information Maximum Likelihood Estimation of a Nested Logit Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(4), pages 657-667, November.
    2. Saul D. Hoffman & Greg J. Duncan, 1988. "A Comparison of Choice-Based Multinomial and Nested Logit Models: The Family Structure and Welfare Use Decisions of Divorced or Separated Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(4), pages 550-562.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lei, Xiaoyan & Strauss, John & Tian, Meng & Zhao, Yaohui, 2011. "Living Arrangements of the Elderly in China: Evidence from CHARLS," IZA Discussion Papers 6249, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Eric V. Edmonds & Kristin Mammen & Douglas L. Miller, 2005. "Rearranging the Family?: Income Support and Elderly Living Arrangements in a Low-Income Country," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    3. Dwayne Benjamin & Loren Brandt & Jia-Zhueng Fan, 2003. "Ceaseless Toil? Health and Labor Supply of the Elderly in Rural China," Working Papers benjamin-03-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    4. Sarmistha Pal, 2004. "Do Children Act As Old Age Security in Rural India? Evidence from an Analysis of Elderly Living Arrangements," Labor and Demography 0405002, EconWPA, revised 15 Oct 2004.
    5. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Lisa A Cameron, 2005. "Do Coresidency with and Financial Transfers from Children Reduce the Need for Elderly Parents to Work in Developing Countries?," CEPR Discussion Papers 508, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    6. Pal, Sarmistha, 2007. "Effects of Intergenerational Transfers on Elderly Coresidence with Adult Children: Evidence from Rural India," IZA Discussion Papers 2847, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. de Brauw, Alan, 2004. "Parents As Public Goods: Theory And Evidence From Rural China," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20298, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. Giang, Thanh Long & Pfau, Wade Donald, 2007. "Patterns and Determinants of Living Arrangements for the Elderly in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 24949, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Kevane, Michael & Levine, David I., 2000. "The Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt09m817c0, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    10. Pushkar Maitra & Ranjan Ray, 2003. "Resource inflows and household composition: evidence from South African panel data," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(8), pages 1037-1047.
    11. Cai, Fang & Giles, John & Meng, Xin, 2006. "How well do children insure parents against low retirement income? An analysis using survey data from urban China," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(12), pages 2229-2255, December.
    12. Kathryn Yount & Zeinab Khadr, 2008. "Gender, Social Change, and Living Arrangements Among Older Egyptians During the 1990s," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(2), pages 201-225, April.
    13. Michael Kevane & David I. Levine, 2003. "Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia," Development and Comp Systems 0303003, EconWPA.
    14. Hsin-Ling Hsieh & Shin-Yi Chou & Echu Liu & Hsien-Ming Lien, 2015. "Strengthening or Weakening? The Impact of Universal Health Insurance on Intergenerational Coresidence in Taiwan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 883-904, June.
    15. Lisa Cameron & Deborah Cobb-Clark, 2001. "Old-Age Support in Indonesia: Labor Supply, Intergenerational Transfers and Living Arrangements," CEPR Discussion Papers 429, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    16. Xiaoyan Lei & John Strauss & Meng Tian & Yaohui Zhao, 2011. "Living Arrangements of the Elderly in China Evidence from CHARLS," Working Papers WR-866, RAND Corporation.
    17. Kwan Ok Lee & Gary Painter, 2014. "Housing Tenure Transitions of Older Households: What is the Role of Child Proximity?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 109-152, March.
    18. Cameron, L. & Cobb-Clark, D., 2001. "Old-Age Support in Developing Countries: Labor Supply, Ingenerational Transfers and Living Arrangements," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 773, The University of Melbourne.
    19. Derek Headey & Olivier Ecker & Jean-Francois Trinh Tan, 2014. "Shocks to the system: monitoring food security in a volatile world," Chapters,in: Handbook on Food, chapter 3, pages 41-71 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination


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